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3 ways to use Mozilla Hubs, a VR platform that’s accessible and private by design

Mozilla Blog - ti, 29/11/2022 - 18:00
A 3D illustration shows human, animal, food and robotic characters floating in a nature setting.Credit: JR Ingram / Mozilla

When NASA’s Webb Space Telescope team and artist Ashley Zelinskie wanted to bring space exploration to everyone, they chose Mozilla Hubs, our open source platform for creating 3D virtual spaces right from your browser. 

Ashley told us that they “didn’t want to cut people out that didn’t have fancy VR headsets or little experience in VR. … If we were going to invite the world to experience the Webb Telescope we wanted everyone to be able to attend.” 

That’s exactly why Mozilla has been investing in the immersive web: We believe that virtual worlds are part of the future of the internet, and we want them to be accessible and safe for all. 

That means each Hubs user controls access to the virtual world they created, which is only discoverable to the people they share it with. Hubs users and their guests can also immerse themselves in this world right from their desktop or mobile browser – no downloads or installations required. And while you can use a VR headset, you can access the same spaces through your phone, tablet or desktop computer.

If you’re curious, take a look at a few ways people have been creating immersive worlds with Mozilla Hubs: 

To create art galleries and portfolios A screenshot from a Mozilla Hubs room shows an art gallery.Credit: Apart Poster Gallery by Paradowski Creative

It’s not just space art. A virtual museum of art prints put together by the creative agency Paradowski helped raise money for a COVID-19 response fund by the World Health Organization. In St. Louis, Missouri, the American Institute of Graphic Arts showcased artists’ work during the school’s annual design show. In the U.K., the Royal Institute of British Architects presented an exhibition that immersed visitors in architectural milestones over the last five centuries. 

While Mozilla Hubs can host projects on the grandest scale, you can use it for personal projects too: Whether you’re an artist, photographer or a 3D modeler, you can create an immersive portfolio that’s easy to use and accessible to anybody with a browser.

To build spaces for hobbies (and meet new people) A screenshot from a Mozilla Hubs space shows a group of human and animal characters. Credit: Mozilla Hubs Creator Labs

The website Meetup lets people find local events based on their interests – from pet poultry to coding to learning a new language. In addition to in-person gatherings, the platform allows people to organize online. Those who wish to meet up virtually can do so in a 3D space through Hubs. 

You can create your own immersive space and invite others. You can also just grab an existing room made available by another creator, remix it and make it your own.

To teach and learn 

NYU Langone Health, one of the largest healthcare systems in the northeast U.S., uses Hubs to teach anatomy. Hubs helps instructors immerse medical students in the coursework, including 3D vascular stereoscopic models.

A screenshot from a Mozilla Hubs room shows a drought map.Credit: Screenshot courtesy of Dr. Tutaleni Asino

Oklahoma State University’s Emerging Technologies and Creativity Research Lab created a virtual science expo that showcased different Earth environments and hosted Q&A sessions with scientists.

Last week we had the first full VR class on @MozillaHubs at @UCAM Here I would like to share an article describing this exciting experience: https://t.co/nd7ztTx8fC#Innovation #education #Technology #Socialmedia #elearning #Creativity #educationtechnology #edutech #distantlearn pic.twitter.com/4UxB5n0tVv

— Pau Guardiola (@PauGuardiolaNet) July 14, 2020

Olympic medalist Sofía Toro, along with professors from the Universidad Católica San Antonio in Spain, even taught a windsurfing class online using Hubs.

Virtual spaces offer new opportunities for connections and innovation. Through Hubs, Mozilla wants to make those opportunities available to everyone. Learn more and join the Hubs community here.  

The post 3 ways to use Mozilla Hubs, a VR platform that’s accessible and private by design appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

New phone? Give yourself the gift of privacy with these 5 tips

Mozilla Blog - wo, 23/11/2022 - 18:19
An illustration shows two gift boxes and a padlock.Credit: Nick Velazquez

So you’ve unboxed a shiny new phone, peeled the sticker off the screen and transferred your data. If you’re reading this, you’ve made the smart decision to take another important step: Setting up your device for privacy and security

Here are five steps you can take to help keep your data safe. Your future self thanks you.

1. Set up privacy controls on your new devices

Do you know which apps know your location, track your online activity and have access to your contacts? Check your privacy settings to make sure you’re only sharing what you’re comfortable sharing with your apps. Here’s how to get to your phone’s privacy settings:

  • iPhone: Settings > Privacy & Security
  • Android: Settings > Privacy > Permission Manager
2. Turn on auto-update

Updates can be disruptive, but they’re also vital in keeping your device safe from hackers who take advantage of security holes that updates are intended to patch. Here’s where you can turn on auto-update:

  • iPhone: Settings > General > Software Update > Automatic Updates
  • Android: Settings > Software Updates
3. Opt out of the default browser

Sure it’s convenient to use the browser that’s already on your phone. But you do have a choice. Download Firefox to use a browser that’s backed by a nonprofit and that will always put you and your privacy first. Once you’ve installed Firefox, here’s how to make it your default browser:

  • iPhone: Settings > Firefox > Default Browser App > Firefox
  • Android: Settings > Set as default browser > Firefox for Android > Set as default

Another benefit: If you already use Firefox on desktop, you’ll get to see your bookmarks, history and saved credit card information and passwords on your phone too. Just log into your Firefox account to move seamlessly between your devices. 

A table compares major browsers' security and privacy features, including private browsing, blocking third-party tracking cookies by default, blocking cryptomining scripts and blocking social trackers. Firefox checks the boxes for all. 4. Prevent spam texts and calls with Firefox Relay

Want fewer spam text messages and calls? Sign up for Firefox Relay, which gives you a phone number mask (i.e. not your true digits) when website forms ask for your number. That way, when you’re making restaurant reservations or signing up for discount codes, you lessen the chance of companies selling your phone number to third parties. Bonus: You can even give your phone number mask to people when you don’t want to give them your true number just yet. Phone calls and texts will automatically get forwarded to you. Learn more about how Firefox Relay works here.

5. Consider using a VPN

Many mobile apps don’t implement encryption properly, leaving the data on your phone vulnerable to hackers. Using a VPN encrypts your connection and conceals your IP address, shielding your identity and location from prying eyes. The Mozilla VPN, unlike some services, will never log and sell your data. (P.S. We’ve made it more accessible to take advantage of both Firefox Relay and Mozilla VPN. Learn more about it here.)

Staying secure and private online isn’t hard, but it does take some effort. Mozilla is always here to help. For more tips about living your best online life, check out our #AskFirefox series on YouTube

Layer on even more protection with phone number masking Sign up for Firefox Relay

The post New phone? Give yourself the gift of privacy with these 5 tips appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

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Mozilla Thunderbird: Help Keep Thunderbird Alive and Thriving In 2023

Mozilla planet - ti, 22/11/2022 - 17:35

Roc, the Thunderbird mascot

A few short years ago Thunderbird was on the verge of extinction. But you saved us! This year we began work on an Android version of Thunderbird, made excellent progress toward next year’s “Supernova” release, and hired more talented software engineers, developers, and designers to help us make Thunderbird better than ever in 2023.

Putting YOU In Control — Not A Corporation

Since 2003, part of our mission has been giving you a customizable communication experience full of powerful features. The other part of Thunderbird’s mission is more personal: Respecting your privacy and putting you in control – not a corporation. 

We never show advertisements, and we never sell your data. That’s because Thunderbird is completely funded by gifts from generous people just like you. You keep this great software free, and you keep us thriving! 

But accomplishing this mission is expensive. Consistently improving Thunderbird and keeping it competitive means ensuring your security in a constantly changing landscape of mail providers. It means maintaining complex server infrastructure. It means fixing bugs and updating old code. It means striving for full accessibility and a refreshing, modern design. 

Help Thunderbird Thrive In 2023

So today, we’re asking for your help. Did you know that development of Thunderbird is funded by less than 1% of the people who use and enjoy it? 

If you find value in using Thunderbird, please consider giving a gift to support it. Your contributions make a huge difference. And if you’ve already donated this year, THANK YOU!

Thank you for using Thunderbird, and thank you for trusting us with your important daily communications. 

The post Help Keep Thunderbird Alive and Thriving In 2023 appeared first on The Thunderbird Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Improving Firefox stability with this one weird trick

Mozilla planet - ti, 22/11/2022 - 15:16

The first computer I owned shipped with 128 KiB of RAM and to this day I’m still jarred by the idea that applications can run out of memory given that even 15-year-old machines often shipped with 4 GiB of memory. And yet it’s one of the most common causes of instability experienced by users and in the case of Firefox the biggest source of crashes on Windows.

As such, at Mozilla, we spend significant resources trimming down Firefox memory consumption and carefully monitoring the changes. Some extra efforts have been spent on the Windows platform because Firefox was more likely to run out of memory there than on macOS or Linux. And yet none of those efforts had the impact of a cool trick we deployed in Firefox 105.

But first things first, to understand why applications running on Windows are more prone to running out of memory compared to other operating systems it’s important to understand how Windows handles memory.

All modern operating systems allow applications to allocate chunks of the address space. Initially these chunks only represent address ranges that aren’t backed by physical memory unless data is stored in them. When an application starts using a bit of address space it has reserved, the OS will dedicate a chunk of physical memory to back it, possibly swapping out some existing data if need be. Both Linux and macOS work this way, and so does Windows except that it requires an extra step compared to the other OSes.

After an application has requested a chunk of address space it needs to commit it before being able to use it. Committing a range requires Windows to guarantee it can always find some physical memory to back it. Afterwards, it behaves just like Linux and macOS. As such Windows limits how much memory can be committed to the sum of the machine’s physical memory plus the size of the swap file.

This resource – known as commit space – is a hard limit for applications. Memory allocations will start to fail once the limit is reached. In operating system speech this means that Windows does not allow applications to overcommit memory.

One interesting aspect of this system is that an application can commit memory that it won’t use. The committed amount will still count against the limit even if no data is stored in the corresponding areas and thus no physical memory has been used to back the committed region. When we started analyzing out of memory crashes we discovered that many users still had plenty of physical memory available – sometimes gigabytes of it – but were running out of commit space instead.

Why was that happening? We don’t really know but we made some educated guesses: Firefox tracks all the memory it uses and we could account for all the memory that we committed directly.

However, we have no control over Windows system libraries and in particular graphics drivers. One thing we noticed is that graphics drivers commit memory to make room for textures in system memory. This allows them to swap textures out of the GPU memory if there isn’t enough and keep them in system memory instead. A mechanism that is similar to how regular memory can be swapped out to disk when there is not enough RAM available. In practice, this rarely happens, but these areas still count against the limit.

We had no way of fixing this issue directly but we still had an ace up our sleeve: when an application runs out of memory on Windows it’s not outright killed by the OS, its allocation simply fails and it can then decide what it does by itself.

In some cases, Firefox could handle the failed allocation, but in most cases, there is no sensible or safe way to handle the error and it would need to crash in a controlled way… but what if we could recover from this situation instead? Windows automatically resizes the swap file when it’s almost full, increasing the amount of commit space available. Could we use this to our advantage?

It turns out that the answer is yes, we can. So we adjusted Firefox to wait for a bit instead of crashing and then retry the failed memory allocation. This leads to a bit of jank as the browser can be stuck for a fraction of a second, but it’s a lot better than crashing.

There’s also another angle to this: Firefox is made up of several processes and can survive losing all of them but the main one. Delaying a main process crash might lead to another process dying if memory is tight. This is good because it would free up memory and let us resume execution, for example by getting rid of a web page with runaway memory consumption.

If a content process died we would need to reload it if it was the GPU process instead the browser would briefly flash while we relaunched it; either way, the result is less disruptive than a full browser crash. We used a similar trick in Firefox for Android and Firefox OS before that and it worked well on both platforms.

This little trick shipped in Firefox 105 and had an enormous impact on Firefox stability on Windows. The chart below shows how many out-of-memory browser crashes were experienced by users per active usage hours:

Firefox trick

You’re looking at a >70% reduction in crashes, far more than our rosiest predictions.

And we’re not done yet! Stalling the main process led to a smaller increase in tab crashes – which are also unpleasant for the user even if not nearly as annoying as a full browser crash – so we’re cutting those down too.

Last but not least we want to improve Firefox behavior in low-memory scenarios by responding differently to cases where we’re low on commit space and cases where we’re low on physical memory, this will reduce swapping and help shrink Firefox footprint to make room for other applications.

I’d like to send special thanks to my colleague Raymond Kraesig who implemented this “trick”, carefully monitored its impact and is working on the aforementioned improvements.

The post Improving Firefox stability with this one weird trick appeared first on Mozilla Hacks - the Web developer blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: The best gift for anyone who wants to feel safer when they go online: Mozilla privacy products

Mozilla planet - mo, 21/11/2022 - 15:00

The holidays are a wonderful time of the year where we are happily shopping for unique gifts for loved ones online. It also means we’re sharing our personal information online like giving out email addresses or phone numbers to sign up for discount programs or creating new accounts. Whenever we go online, we are asked to give our personal information, which can end up in the wrong hands. Once our information is out there and publicly available it’s even tougher to get it back. 

Here at Mozilla, a mission-driven company with a 20-year track record of fighting for online privacy and a healthier internet, we get that. Our privacy products, Firefox Relay and Mozilla VPN, have helped people feel safer when they go online and have blocked more than 1.5 million unwanted emails from people’s inboxes while keeping their real email addresses safe from trackers across the web. So, wherever you go online with Mozilla’s trusted products and services, your information is safer. 

Mozilla’s privacy products include Firefox Relay which hides your real email address and masks your phone number, and Mozilla VPN, our fast and easy-to-use VPN service, that helps protect the privacy of your network traffic. Together they help you keep what you do online private. And now, we are making it easier to get both Firefox Relay and Mozilla VPN together — for $6.99 a month when you sign up for an annual subscription. Whether you currently use one or none of these products, here’s more information on what makes these products a must-have whenever you go online. 

Mozilla privacy product #1: Firefox Relay

Since the launch of Firefox Relay, thousands of users have signed up for our smart, easy solution that hides their real email address to help protect their identity. This year, we continued to look to our users to improve and shape their Firefox Relay experience. In 2022, we added user-requested features which included increasing the email limit size to 10 MB and making Firefox Relay available as a Chrome extension. For Firefox Relay Premium users, we added a phone number mask feature to protect personal phone numbers. Whether you are signing up for loyalty programs, booking a restaurant reservation, or making purchases that require your phone number, now you can feel confident that your personal phone number won’t fall in the wrong hands. You can read more about the phone number mask feature here. Firefox Relay has helped keep thousands of people’s information safe. Check out the great coverage in The Verge, Popular Science, Consumer Reports and PCMag

Mozilla privacy product  #2: Mozilla VPN 

This year, Mozilla VPN, our fast and easy-to-use Virtual Private Network service, integrated with one of our users’ favorite Firefox Add-ons, Multi-Account Containers, to offer a unique, privacy solution that is only available in Firefox. We also included the ability to multi-hop, which means that you can use two VPN servers instead of one for extra protection. You can read more about this feature here. To date, thousands of people have signed up to Mozilla VPN, which provides device-level network traffic protection as you go on the web. Besides our loyal users, there are numerous news articles (Consumer Reports, Washington Post, KTLA-TV and The Verge) that can tell you more about how a VPN can help whenever you use the web. 

Better Together: Firefox Relay and Mozilla VPN

If there’s one person you shouldn’t forget on your list, it’s giving yourself the gift of privacy with Mozilla’s products. And now we’re offering Firefox Relay and Mozilla VPN together at $6.99 a month, when you sign up for an annual subscription. 

Developed by Mozilla, we are committed to innovate and deliver new products like Mozilla VPN and Firefox Relay. We know that it’s more important than ever for you to be safe, and for you to know that what you do online is your own business. By subscribing to our products, users support both Mozilla’s product development and our mission to build a better web for all. 

Subscribe today either from the Mozilla VPN or Firefox Relay site.

The post The best gift for anyone who wants to feel safer when they go online: Mozilla privacy products  appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The best gift for anyone who wants to feel safer when they go online: Mozilla privacy products 

Mozilla Blog - mo, 21/11/2022 - 15:00

The holidays are a wonderful time of the year where we are happily shopping for unique gifts for loved ones online. It also means we’re sharing our personal information online like giving out email addresses or phone numbers to sign up for discount programs or creating new accounts. Whenever we go online, we are asked to give our personal information, which can end up in the wrong hands. Once our information is out there and publicly available it’s even tougher to get it back. 

Here at Mozilla, a mission-driven company with a 20-year track record of fighting for online privacy and a healthier internet, we get that. Our privacy products, Firefox Relay and Mozilla VPN, have helped people feel safer when they go online and have blocked more than 1.5 million unwanted emails from people’s inboxes while keeping their real email addresses safe from trackers across the web. So, wherever you go online with Mozilla’s trusted products and services, your information is safer. 

Mozilla’s privacy products include Firefox Relay which hides your real email address and masks your phone number, and Mozilla VPN, our fast and easy-to-use VPN service, that helps protect the privacy of your network traffic. Together they help you keep what you do online private. And now, we are making it easier to get both Firefox Relay and Mozilla VPN together — for $6.99 a month when you sign up for an annual subscription. Whether you currently use one or none of these products, here’s more information on what makes these products a must-have whenever you go online. 

Mozilla privacy product #1: Firefox Relay

Since the launch of Firefox Relay, thousands of users have signed up for our smart, easy solution that hides their real email address to help protect their identity. This year, we continued to look to our users to improve and shape their Firefox Relay experience. In 2022, we added user-requested features which included increasing the email limit size to 10 MB and making Firefox Relay available as a Chrome extension. For Firefox Relay Premium users, we added a phone number mask feature to protect personal phone numbers. Whether you are signing up for loyalty programs, booking a restaurant reservation, or making purchases that require your phone number, now you can feel confident that your personal phone number won’t fall in the wrong hands. You can read more about the phone number mask feature here. Firefox Relay has helped keep thousands of people’s information safe. Check out the great coverage in The Verge, Popular Science, Consumer Reports and PCMag

Mozilla privacy product  #2: Mozilla VPN 

This year, Mozilla VPN, our fast and easy-to-use Virtual Private Network service, integrated with one of our users’ favorite Firefox Add-ons, Multi-Account Containers, to offer a unique, privacy solution that is only available in Firefox. We also included the ability to multi-hop, which means that you can use two VPN servers instead of one for extra protection. You can read more about this feature here. To date, thousands of people have signed up to Mozilla VPN, which provides device-level network traffic protection as you go on the web. Besides our loyal users, there are numerous news articles (Consumer Reports, Washington Post, KTLA-TV and The Verge) that can tell you more about how a VPN can help whenever you use the web. 

Better Together: Firefox Relay and Mozilla VPN

If there’s one person you shouldn’t forget on your list, it’s giving yourself the gift of privacy with Mozilla’s products. And now we’re offering Firefox Relay and Mozilla VPN together at $6.99 a month, when you sign up for an annual subscription. 

Developed by Mozilla, we are committed to innovate and deliver new products like Mozilla VPN and Firefox Relay. We know that it’s more important than ever for you to be safe, and for you to know that what you do online is your own business. By subscribing to our products, users support both Mozilla’s product development and our mission to build a better web for all. 

Subscribe today either from the Mozilla VPN or Firefox Relay site.

The post The best gift for anyone who wants to feel safer when they go online: Mozilla privacy products  appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Talospace Project: Firefox 107 on POWER

Mozilla planet - fr, 18/11/2022 - 02:50
Firefox 107 is out, a modest update, though there are some developer-facing changes. As before linking still requires Dan Horák's patch from bug 1775202 or the browser won't link on 64-bit Power ISA (alternatively put --disable-webrtc in your .mozconfig if you don't need WebRTC). Otherwise the build works with the .mozconfigs from Firefox 105 and the PGO-LTO patch from Firefox 101.
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Release Management Team: Firefox Regional feedback: Let's start with Europe

Mozilla planet - fr, 18/11/2022 - 01:00

We work hard as an organization to ship the best browser possible every 4 weeks with about 1000 new patches per release.

We ship new features to make our browser useful and easy to use. We also do platform work to be able to render new sites and web applications while remaining compatible with millions of websites created a decade (or more) ago.

This ongoing work also includes updating our translations in more than 100 languages thanks to our impressive community of localizers.

Yes, we want to make sure that Firefox can be used everywhere by everybody.

But could we maybe do better with a tighter feedback loop from our local communities?

Let’s give a few examples from our bug tracker:

Usually, major issues that may impact users in a specific country are fixed before we ship the final release, but occasionally we discover them after shipping and have to ship a fix in a dot release.

We talked about significant breakage with a regional impact, but what about papercuts?

Web compatibility, incorrect translations, internationalization issues, PiP subtitles support, certificates… The list of potential problems in a region that may affect our users is long and we may not know about them.

Maybe these issues are discussed in places we don’t know about, in languages we don’t speak. Maybe these issues are already filed in our bug tracker but don’t get prioritized correctly because we don’t know about their regional impact. Maybe a handful of specific regional issues are making Firefox hard to use in a specific country and the information is out there. Maybe all we need is somebody who understands these issues to surface these bugs in Bugzilla to our developers.

In a nutshell, we don’t know what we don’t know.

That is why I intend to work on studying and setting up basic feedback mechanisms to evaluate the health of Firefox in a few European countries so as to help my team (Release Management) prioritize product fixes for existing bugs which have the highest impact on our users and also to get help identifying regressions on our pre-release channels (Nightly, Beta, Developer Edition).

My very first goal is to make contacts with Mozillians in a handful of European countries (France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain) 1 that could help me identify issues that affect them locally, identify their top web compatibility issues, and maybe relay a general message for community feedback on pre-release channels.

To that effect, I created a Local Firefox room on the Mozilla Matrix instance. If you are interested in collaborating with me on this project, you are very welcome to join it and say hello (my nick is Pascal). I can speak with you in French and Spanish as well if you don’t feel comfortable speaking in English.

Thanks!

Pascal

  1. I am focusing on a few European countries for timezone and bandwidth reasons since I’ll do that alongside my role as a Firefox Release Manager, but I am open to feedback from other regions as well of course. 

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Addons Blog: Manifest v3 signing available November 21 on Firefox Nightly

Mozilla planet - to, 17/11/2022 - 15:00

Starting November 21, 2022 add-on developers are welcome to upload their Firefox Manifest version 3 (MV3) compatible extensions to addons.mozilla.org (AMO) and have them signed as MV3 extensions. Getting an early jump on MV3 signing enables you to begin testing your extension’s future functionality on Nightly to ensure a smooth eventual transition to MV3 in Firefox.

To be clear, Firefox will continue to support MV2 extensions for the foreseeable future, even as we welcome MV3 extensions in the release to general availability in Firefox 109 (January 17, 2023). Our goal has been to ensure a seamless transition from MV2 to MV3 for extension developers. Taking a gradual approach and gathering feedback as MV3 matures, we anticipate opportunities will emerge over time to modify our initial MV3 offering. In these instances, we intend to take the time necessary to make informed decisions about our approach.

Towards the end of 2023 — once we’ve had time to evaluate and assess MV3’s rollout (including identifying important MV2 use cases that will persist into MV3) — we’ll decide on an appropriate timeframe to deprecate MV2. Once this timeframe is established, we’ll communicate MV2’s closure process with advance notice. For now, please see this guide for supporting both MV2 and MV3 versions of your extension on AMO.

Mozilla’s vision for Firefox MV3

Firefox MV3 offers simplified and consolidated APIs, enhanced security and privacy mechanisms, and functionality to better support mobile platforms. As we continue to collaborate with other browser vendors and the developer community to shape MV3, we recognize cross-browser compatibility as a fundamental consideration. That said, we’re also implementing distinct elements to suit Firefox’s product and community needs. We want to give extension developers creative flexibility and choice, while ensuring users maintain access to the highest standards of extension customization and security. Firefox MV3 stands apart from other iterations of MV3 in two critical ways:

  1. While other browser vendors introduced declarativeNetRequest (DNR) in favor of blocking Web Request in MV3, Firefox MV3 continues to support blocking Web Request and will support a compatible version of DNR in the future. We believe blocking Web Request is more flexible than DNR, thus allowing for more creative use cases in content blockers and other privacy and security extensions. However, DNR also has important performance and compatibility characteristics we want to support.
  2. Firefox MV3 offers Event Pages as the background script in lieu of service workers, though we plan to support service workers in the future for compatibility. Event Pages offer benefits like DOM and Web APIs that aren’t available to service workers, while also generally providing a simpler migration path.

Over subsequent releases next year, we’ll continue to expand Firefox MV3 compatibility.

MV3 also ushers an exciting user interface change in the form of the new extensions button (already available on Firefox Nightly). This will give users direct control over which extensions can access specific web sites.

The extensions button will give Firefox users direct control over website specific extension permissions.

Users are able to review, grant, or revoke MV3 extension access to any website. MV2 extensions will display in the button interface, but permissions access is unavailable. Please see this post for more information about the new extensions button.

If you’re planning to migrate your MV2 extension to MV3, there are steps you can take today to get started. We always encourage feedback from our developer community, so don’t hesitate to get in touch:

The post Manifest v3 signing available November 21 on Firefox Nightly appeared first on Mozilla Add-ons Community Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Addons Blog: Extensions button and how to handle permissions in Manifest V3

Mozilla planet - to, 17/11/2022 - 12:46

Manifest V3 (MV3) is bringing new user-facing changes to Firefox, including an extensions button to manage installed and enabled browser extension permissions (origin controls), providing Firefox users control over extension access to their browsers. The first building blocks of this button were added to Nightly in Firefox 107 and will become available with the general release of MV3 in Firefox 109.

Extensions button

The extensions button will give Firefox users direct control over website specific extension permissions.

In MV2, host permissions are granted by the user at the time of install and there’s no elegant way for the user to change this setting (short of uninstalling/reinstalling and choosing different permissions). But with the new extensions button in MV3 in Firefox, users will have easy access and persistent control over which extensions can access any web page, at any time. Users are free to grant ongoing access to a website, or make a choice per visit. To enable this, MV3 treats host permissions (listed in the extension manifest) as opt-in.

The button panel will display the user’s installed and enabled extensions and their current permission state. In addition to managing host permissions, the panel also allows the user to manage, remove, or report the extension. Extensions with browser actions will behave similarly in the toolbar as in the panel.

Manifest V2 (MV2) extensions will also display in the panel; however users can’t take actions for MV2 host permissions since those were granted at installation and this choice cannot be reversed in MV2 without uninstalling the extension and starting again.

You can also find more information about the extensions button from support.mozilla.org

How to deal with opt-in permissions in extension code

The Permissions API provides a way for developers to read and request permissions.

With permissions.request(), you can request specific permissions that have been defined as optional permissions in the manifest:

const permissionsToRequest = { permissions: ["bookmarks", "history"], origins: ["https://developer.mozilla.org/"] } async function requestPermissions() { function onResponse(response) { if (response) { console.log("Permission was granted"); } else { console.log("Permission was refused"); } return browser.permissions.getAll(); } const response = await browser.permissions.request(permissionsToRequest); const currentPermissions = await onResponse(response); console.log(`Current permissions:`, currentPermissions); }

This is handy when the request for permissions is tied to a user action like selecting a context menu item. Note that you cannot request for a permission that is not defined in the manifest.

Other times, you’ll want to react to a permission being granted or removed. This can be done with permissions.onAdded and permissions.onRemoved respectively.

function handleAdded(permissions) { console.log(`New API permissions: ${permissions.permissions}`); console.log(`New host permissions: ${permissions.origins}`); } browser.permissions.onAdded.addListener(handleAdded);

Finally, you can check for already existing permissions in two different ways: permissions.getAll() returns a list of all granted permissions and permissions.contains(permissionsToCheck) checks for specific permissions and resolves to true if, and only if, all checked permissions are granted.

// Extension permissions are: // "webRequest", "tabs", "*://*.mozilla.org/*" let testPermissions1 = { origins: ["*://mozilla.org/"], permissions: ["tabs"] }; const testResult1 = await browser.permissions.contains(testPermissions1); console.log(testResult1); // true

We always encourage feedback from our developer community, so don’t hesitate to get in touch:

The post Extensions button and how to handle permissions in Manifest V3 appeared first on Mozilla Add-ons Community Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Privacy Blog: Mozilla Comments on FTC’s “Commercial Surveillance and Data Security” Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

Mozilla planet - ti, 15/11/2022 - 23:32

Like regulators around the world, the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is exploring the possibility of new rules to protect consumer privacy online. We’re excited to see the FTC take this important step and ask key questions surrounding commercial surveillance and data security practices, from advertising and transparency to data collection and deceptive design practices.

Mozilla has a long track record on privacy. It’s an integral aspect of our Manifesto, where we state that individuals’ security and privacy on the internet are fundamental and must not be treated as optional. It’s evidenced in our products and in our collaboration with others in industry to forge solutions to create a better, more private online experience.

But we can’t do it alone. Without rules of the road, sufficient incentive won’t exist to shift the rest of the industry to more privacy preserving practices. To meet that need, we’ve called for comprehensive privacy legislation like the American Data Privacy and Protection Act (ADPPA), greater ad transparency, and strong enforcement around the world. In our latest submission to the FTC, we detail the urgent need for US regulators and policymakers to take action to create a healthier internet.

At a high level, our comments focus on:

Privacy Practices Online: Everyone should have control over their personal data, understand how it’s obtained and used, and be able to access, modify, or delete it. To that end, Mozilla has long advocated for companies to adopt better privacy practices through our Lean Data Practices methodology. It’s also important that rules govern not just the collection of data, but the uses of that data in order to limit harmful effects – from the impact of addictive user interfaces on kids to the use of recommendation systems to discrimination in housing and jobs.

Privacy Preserving Advertising: The way in which advertising is conducted today is broken and causes more harm than good.  At the same time, we believe there’s nothing inherently wrong with digital advertising. It supports a large section of services provided on the web and it is here to stay, in some form. A combination of new research, technical solutions, increased public awareness, and effective regulatory enforcement can reform advertising for the future of the web.

Deceptive Design Practices: Consumers are being tricked into handing over their data with deceptive patterns, then that data is used to manipulate them. The use of deceptive design patterns results in consumer harms including limited or frustrated choice, lower quality, lower innovation, poor privacy, and unfair contracts. This is bread-and-butter deception – the online manifestation of what the FTC was established to address – and it is critical that the FTC has the authority to take action against such deception.

Automated Decision Making Systems (ADMS): For years, research and investigative reporting have uncovered instances of ADMS that cause or enable discrimination, surveillance, or other harms to individuals and communities. The risks stemming from ADMS are particularly grave where these systems affect, for example, people’s livelihoods, safety, and liberties. We need enforceable rules that hold developers and deployers of ADMS to a higher standard, built on the pillars of transparency, accountability, and redress.

Systemic Transparency and Data Sharing: We encourage the FTC to strengthen the mechanisms that empower policymakers and trusted experts to better understand what is happening on major internet platforms. To achieve this, we need greater access to platform data (subject to strong user privacy protections), greater research tooling, and greater protections for researchers.

Practices surrounding consumer data on the internet today, and the resulting societal harms, have put people and trust at risk. The future of privacy online requires industry to step up to protect and empower people online, and demands that lawmakers and regulators implement frameworks that create the ecosystem and incentive for a better internet ahead.

To read Mozilla’s full submission, click here.

The post Mozilla Comments on FTC’s “Commercial Surveillance and Data Security” Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking appeared first on Open Policy & Advocacy.

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4 ways a Firefox account comes in handy

Mozilla Blog - ti, 15/11/2022 - 20:57
An illustration shows a Firefox browser window with cycling arrows in the middle, a pop-up hidden password field and the Pocket logo next to the address bar.Credit: Nick Velazquez / Mozilla

Even people who are very online can use some help navigating the internet – from keeping credit card details safe when online shopping to generating a password when one simply doesn’t have any more passwords in them.

Using Firefox as your main browser helps take care of that. Want to level up? With a Firefox account, you can take advantage of the following features whether you’re using your desktop device, tablet or your phone.

1. See your bookmarks across devices

To easily find your go-to places on the web (aka your bookmarks) on your phone or tablet, use Firefox mobile for Android or iOS. Not only will you get the same privacy-first experience you enjoy when using Firefox on desktop, you’ll also have Firefox Sync, which lets you see your bookmarks wherever you log into your Firefox account. Firefox Sync allows you to choose the data you want to take with you. In addition to bookmarks, you also have the option to sync your browsing history, open tabs and your installed add-ons across devices. 

A Firefox browser pop-up shows a window asking the user to choose what they want to sync. 2. Use a secure password manager that goes with you wherever you are

Firefox has a built-in password manager that can generate a secure password when you’re creating a new account on a website. (Just click the password field and hit Use a Securely Generated Password. Firefox will save your login for that site.) When you’re using Firefox on your mobile device and you’re logged into your Firefox account, you’ll see your usernames and passwords right where you saved them.

3. Shop securely across devices with credit card autofill

Firefox will also automatically fill in credit card information that you saved when purchasing something online. You just need to enter your CVV number, which Firefox doesn’t save as a security measure. For extra protection, you can choose to require your device’s password, face ID or fingerprint before Firefox autofills your credit card data. Here’s how to turn that on. 

While this works both on desktop and mobile devices when you’re signed into your Firefox account, you can also opt to start shopping on one device and send your browser tab to another to complete your purchase. For example, you can add items to an online shopping cart on your phone but choose to check out on your laptop. 

4. Stay productive now, save that article or video for later

The internet is full of stories, whether it’s a long read about Gen Z’s internet habits or a video about nerdcore hip-hop. They’re a fun way to learn about the world, but sometimes, we need to set them aside so we can finish that research paper for class or slide deck for work. Just hit the Pocket button in the toolbar to easily save an article or video. When you’re ready, just log into Pocket with your Firefox account and you’ll find everything you’ve saved.

A screenshot from the Firefox browser shows the Pocket logo next to the address bar. Switching to Firefox on your iOS or Android device is easy

If you already use Firefox on desktop, then you already know how Firefox beats other major browsers on security, privacy and functionality. You can easily enjoy the same benefits with a Firefox account on your phone or tablet by making Firefox your default browser on mobile. Here’s how to do that: 

A table shows a comparison of Firefox's portability vs. other browsers.

The internet can bring us to our favorite online spaces and take us to new, fascinating places at the tip of our fingers. A Firefox account lets you enjoy all the web has to offer while keeping your data safe – wherever you are. 

Firefox browser logo Get Firefox Get the browser that protects what’s important

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