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Update auf Firefox 52.0.1: Neue Version schließt kritische Sicherheitslücke - CHIP Online

Nieuws verzameld via Google - za, 18/03/2017 - 13:03

soeren-hentzschel.at

Update auf Firefox 52.0.1: Neue Version schließt kritische Sicherheitslücke
CHIP Online
... zu Problemen kommt. Das ist beim lange geplanten Firefox 52 der Fall. Deshalb gibt es nur wenige Tage nach dessen Release ein Blitz-Update auf Firefox 52.0.1. Die Gründe für das Update ist eine von Mozilla als "kritisch" eingestufte Sicherheitslücke.
Pwn2Own 2017: Mozilla veröffentlicht schnelles Update auf Firefox 52.0.1soeren-hentzschel.at
Mozilla veröffentlicht Firefox 52.0.1 ESR mit Sicherheitsverbesserungenit-blogger.net (Blog)

alle 3 nieuwsartikelen »Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Pwn2Own 2017: Mozilla veröffentlicht schnelles Update auf Firefox 52.0.1 - soeren-hentzschel.at

Nieuws verzameld via Google - za, 18/03/2017 - 09:39

soeren-hentzschel.at

Pwn2Own 2017: Mozilla veröffentlicht schnelles Update auf Firefox 52.0.1
soeren-hentzschel.at
Wieder einmal hat der jährlich stattfindende Pwn2Own-Wettbewerb Sicherheitslücken in diversen Browsern, Browser-Plugins und Betriebssystemen offengelegt. Mozilla hat wie immer zügig reagiert und ein umgehendes Sicherheitsupdate auf Firefox 52.0.1 ...
Update auf Firefox 52.0.1: Neue Version schließt kritische SicherheitslückeCHIP Online
Mozilla veröffentlicht Firefox 52.0.1 ESR mit Sicherheitsverbesserungenit-blogger.net (Blog)

alle 3 nieuwsartikelen »Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla dicht ernstig beveiligingslek in Firefox 52 - Security.nl

Nieuws verzameld via Google - za, 18/03/2017 - 08:20

Mozilla dicht ernstig beveiligingslek in Firefox 52
Security.nl
Mozilla heeft een tussentijdse patch uitgebracht voor een ernstig beveiligingslek in Firefox 52 dat gebruikt kan worden om een computer over te nemen. De kwetsbaarheid werd afgelopen donderdag tijdens de Pwn2Own-wedstrijd gevonden en aan Mozilla ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Eugene, Ore., Named 'Gigabit City' by Nonprofit Mozilla Foundation - Government Technology

Nieuws verzameld via Google - vr, 17/03/2017 - 21:24

Government Technology

Eugene, Ore., Named 'Gigabit City' by Nonprofit Mozilla Foundation
Government Technology
Eugene's collaborative tech community, supportive environment for startups, and unique approach to bringing gigabit Internet to the region caught Mozilla's attention. by Sherri Buri McDonald, The Register-Guard, Eugene, Ore. / March 17, 2017 0.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Geen geluid meer in Linux-versie Firefox? ALSA-probleem! - Webwereld

Nieuws verzameld via Google - vr, 17/03/2017 - 07:32

Webwereld

Geen geluid meer in Linux-versie Firefox? ALSA-probleem!
Webwereld
Heb jij je browser bijgewerkt naar versie 52 onder Linux en speelt deze opeens geen geluid meer af? Dan maak je waarschijnlijk gebruik van ALSA. Mozilla heeft de ondersteuning voor deze geluids-backend stopgezet en ondersteunt nu alleen nog maar ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla: большинство людей не знают, как защитить себя в Сети - NAG.RU

Nieuws verzameld via Google - vr, 17/03/2017 - 04:26

Mozilla: большинство людей не знают, как защитить себя в Сети
NAG.RU
Конфиденциальность и безопасность более всего заботят сегодня интернет-пользователей, однако недавний опрос, проведенный разработчиком популярного веб-браузера Firefox, компанией Mozilla, показал, что удручающе большое число ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

'Mozilla moet het zoeken in andere apps' - Computable

Nieuws verzameld via Google - do, 16/03/2017 - 08:40

Computable

'Mozilla moet het zoeken in andere apps'
Computable
De open source-stichting Mozilla die de bekende Firefox-browser ontwikkelt (en voorheen mailclient Thunderbird), moet zijn toekomst zoeken in andere apps. Firefox heeft ooit de hegemonie van het Windows-gebonden Internet Explorer doorbroken, maar is ...

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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

CIA is undermining the security of the internet, says Mozilla - TWCN Tech News (blog)

Nieuws verzameld via Google - do, 16/03/2017 - 06:35

The Sydney Morning Herald

CIA is undermining the security of the internet, says Mozilla
TWCN Tech News (blog)
On this whole issue involving WikiLeaks and CIA, Mozilla reacted strongly. Mozilla published its statement on Mozilla Blogs saying if the information released by WikiLeaks is accurate; then CIA is undermining the security of the internet. Not only CIA ...
WikiLeaks help fixing CIA exploits illegal, but unlikely to be prosecutedThe Hill

alle 5 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Five issues that will determine the future of Internet Health

Mozilla Blog - wo, 15/03/2017 - 18:48

In January, we published our first Internet Health Report on the current state and future of the Internet. In the report, we broke down the concept of Internet health into five issues. Today, we are publishing issue briefs about each of them: online privacy and security, decentralization, openness, web literacy and digital inclusion. These issues are the building blocks to a healthy and vibrant Internet. We hope they will be a guide and resource to you.

We live in a complex, fast moving, political environment. As policies and laws around the world change, we all need to help protect our shared global resource, the Internet. Internet health shouldn’t be a partisan issue, but rather, a cause we can all get behind. And our choices and actions will affect the future health of the Internet, for better or for worse.

We work on many other policies and projects to advance our mission, but we believe that these issue briefs help explain our views and actions in the context of Internet health:

  1. Online Privacy & Security:

Security and privacy on the Internet are fundamental and must not be treated as optional.

In our brief, we highlight the following subtopics:

  • Meaningful user control – People care about privacy. But effective understanding and control are often difficult, or even impossible, in practice.
  • Data collection and use – The tech industry, too often, reflects a culture of ‘collect and hoard all the data’. To preserve trust online, we need to see a change.
  • Government surveillance – Public distrust of government is high because of broad surveillance practices. We need more transparency, accountability and oversight.
  • Cybersecurity – Cybersecurity is user security. It’s about our Internet, our data, and our lives online. Making it a reality requires a shared sense of responsibility.

Protecting your privacy and security doesn’t mean you have something to hide. It means you have the ability to choose who knows where you go and what you do.

2. Openness:

A healthy Internet is open, so that together, we can innovate.

To make that a reality, we focus on these three areas:

  • Open source – Being open can be hard. It exposes every wrinkle and detail to public scrutiny. But it also offers tremendous advantages.
  • Copyright – Offline copyright law built for an analog world doesn’t fit the current digital and mobile reality.
  • Patents – In technology, overbroad and vague patents create fear, uncertainty and doubt for innovators.

Copyright and patent laws should better foster collaboration and economic opportunity. Open source, open standards, and pro-innovation policies must continue to be at the heart of the Internet.

3. Decentralization:

There shouldn’t be online monopolies or oligopolies; a decentralized Internet is a healthy Internet.

To accomplish that goal, we are focusing on the following policy areas.

  • Net neutralityNetwork operators must not be allowed to block or skew connectivity or the choices of Internet users.
  • Interoperability – If short-term economic gains limit long-term industry innovation, then the entire technology industry and economy will suffer the consequences.
  • Competition and choice – We need the Internet to be an engine for competition and user choice, not an enabler of gatekeepers.
  • Local contribution – Local relevance is about more than just language; it’s also tailored to the cultural context and the local community.

When there are just a few organizations and governments who control the majority of online content, the vital flow of ideas and knowledge is blocked. We will continue to look for public policy levers to advance our vision of a decentralized Internet.

4. Digital Inclusion:

People, regardless of race, income, nationality, or gender, should have unfettered access to the Internet.

To help promote an open and inclusive Internet, we are focusing on these issues:

  • Advancing universal access to the whole Internet Everyone should have access to the full diversity of the open Internet.
  • Advancing diversity online – Access to and use of the Internet are far from evenly distributed. This represents a connectivity problem and a diversity problem.
  • Advancing respect online – We must focus on changing and building systems that rely on both technology and humans, to increase and protect diverse voices on the Internet.

Numerous and diverse obstacles stand in the way of digital inclusion, and they won’t be overcome by default. Our aim is to collaborate with, create space for, and elevate everyone’s contributions.

5. Web Literacy:

Everyone should have the skills to read, write and participate in the digital world.

To help people around the globe participate in the digital world, we are focusing on these areas:

  • Moving beyond coding –  Universal web literacy doesn’t mean everyone needs to learn to code; other kinds of technical awareness and empowerment can be very meaningful.
  • Integrating web literacy into education – Incorporating web literacy into education requires examining the opportunities and challenges faced by both educators and youth.
  • Cultivating digital citizenship – Everyday Internet users should be able to shape their own Internet experience, through the choices that they make online and through the policies and organizations they choose to support.

Web literacy should be foundational in education, like reading and math. Empowering people to shape the web enables people to shape society itself. We want people to go beyond consuming and contribute to the future of the Internet.

Promoting, protecting, and preserving a healthy Internet is challenging, and takes a broad movement working on many different fronts. We hope that you will read these and take action alongside us, because in doing so you will be protecting the integrity of the Internet. For our part, we commit to advancing our mission and continuing our fight for a vibrant and healthy Internet.

The post Five issues that will determine the future of Internet Health appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Eugene Joins the Ranks of Mozilla's Gigabit Cities - KLCC FM Public Radio

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 14/03/2017 - 22:13

Eugene Joins the Ranks of Mozilla's Gigabit Cities
KLCC FM Public Radio
Economic development planner Anne Fifield says what caught Mozilla's attention was not just Eugene's new fiber network, but how it's being used to better connect the community. "We had folks from the arts industry working with people in education ...

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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mark Côté: Conduit Field Report, March 2017

Mozilla planet - di, 14/03/2017 - 17:44

For background on Conduit, please see the previous post and the Intent to Implement.

Autoland

We kicked off Conduit work in January starting with the new Autoland service. Right now, much of the Autoland functionality is located in the MozReview Review Board extension: the permissions model, the rewriting of commit messages to reflect the reviewers, and the user interface. The only part that is currently logically separate is the “transplant service”, which actually takes commits from one repo (e.g. reviewboard-hg) and applies it to another (e.g. try, mozilla-central). Since the goal of Conduit is to decouple all the automation from code-review tools, we have to take everything that’s currently in Review Board and move it to new, separate services.

The original plan was to switch Review Board over to the new Autoland service when it was ready, stripping out all the old code from the MozReview extension. This would mean little change for MozReview users (basically just a new, separate UI), but would get people using the new service right away. After Autoland, we’d work on the push-to-review side, hooking that up to Review Board, and then extend both systems to interface with BMO. This strategy of incrementally replacing pieces of MozReview seemed like the best way to find bugs as we went along, rather than a massive switchover all at once.

However, progress was a bit slower than we anticipated, largely due to the fact that so many things were new about this project (see below). We want Autoland to be fully hooked up to BMO by the end of June, and integrating the new system with both Review Board and BMO as we went along seemed increasingly like a bad idea. Instead, we decided to put BMO integration first, and then follow with Review Board later (if indeed we still want to use Review Board as our rich-code-review solution).

This presented us with a problem: if we wouldn’t be hooking the new Autoland service up to Review Board, then we’d have to wait until the push service was also finished before we hooked them both up to BMO. Not wanting to turn everything on at once, we pondered how we could still launch new services as they were completed.

Moving to the other side of the pipeline

The answer is to table our work on Autoland for now and switch to the push service, which is the entrance to the commit pipeline. Building this piece first means that users will be able to push commits to BMO for review. Even though they would not be able to Autoland them right away, we could get feedback and make the service as easy to use as possible. Think of it as a replacement for bzexport.

Thanks to our new Scrum process (see also below), this priority adjustment was not very painful. We’ve been shipping Autoland code each week, so, while it doesn’t do much yet, we’re not abandoning any work in progress or leaving patches half finished. Plus, since this new service is also being started from scratch (although involving lots of code reuse from what’s currently in MozReview), we can apply the lessons we learned from the last couple months, so we should be moving pretty quickly.

Newness

As I mentioned above, although the essence of Conduit work right now is decoupling existing functionality from Review Board, it involves a lot of new stuff. Only recently did we realize exactly how much new stuff there was to get used to!

New team members

We welcomed Israel Madueme to our team in January and threw him right into the thick of things. He’s adapted tremendously well and started contributing immediately. Of course a new team member means new team dynamics, but he already feels like one of us.

Just recently, we’ve stolen dkl from the BMO team, where he’s been working since joining Mozilla 6 years ago. I’m excited to have a long-time A-Teamer join the Conduit team.

A new process

At the moment we have five developers working on the new Conduit services. This is more people on a single project than we’re usually able to pull together, so we needed a process to make sure we’re working to our collective potential. Luckily one of us is a certified ScrumMaster. I’ve never actually experienced Scrum-style development before, but we decided to give it a try.

I’ll have a lot more to say about this in the future, as we’re only just hitting our stride now, but it has felt really good to be working with solid organizational principles. We’re spending more time in meetings than usual, but it’s paying off with a new level of focus and productivity.

A new architecture

Working within Review Board was pretty painful, and the MozReview development environment, while amazing in its breadth and coverage, was slow and too heavily focussed on lengthy end-to-end tests. Our new design follows more of a microservice-based approach. The Autoland verification system (which checks users permissions and ensures that commits have been properly reviewed) is a separate service, as is the UI and the transplant service (as noted above, this last part was actually one of the few pieces of MozReview that was already decoupled, so we’re one step ahead there). Similarly, on the other side of the pipeline, the commit index is a separate service, and the review service may eventually be split up as well.

We’re not yet going whole-hog on microservices—we don’t plan, for starters at least, to have more than 4 or 5 separate services—but we’re already benefitting from being able to work on features in parallel and preventing runaway complexity. The book Building Microservices has been instrumental to our new design, as well as pointing out exactly why we had difficulties in our previous approach.

New operations

As the A-Team is now under Laura Thomson, we’re taking advantage of our new, closer relationship to CloudOps to try a new deployment and operations approach. This has freed us of some of the constraints of working in the data centre while letting us take advantage of a proven toolchain and process.

New technologies

We’re using Python 3.5 (and probably 3.6 at some point) for our new services, which I believe is a first for an A-Team project. It’s new for much of the team, but they’ve quickly adapted, and we’re now insulated against the 2020 deadline for Python 2, as well as benefitting from the niceties of Python 3 like better Unicode support.

We also used a few technologies for the Autoland service that are new to most of the team: React and Tornado. While the team found it interesting to learn them, in retrospect using them now was probably a case of premature optimization. Both added complexity that was unnecessary right now. React’s URL routing was difficult to get working in a way that seamlessly supported a local, Docker-based development environment and a production deployment scenario, and Tornado’s asynchronous nature led to extra complexity in automated tests. Although they are both fine technologies and provide scalable solutions for complex apps, the individual Conduit services are currently too small to really benefit.

We’ve learned from this, so we’re going to use Flask as the back end for the push services (commit index and review-request generator), for now at least, and, if we need a UI, we’ll probably use a relatively simple template approach with JavaScript just for enhancements.

Next

In my next post, I’m going to discuss our approach to the push services and more on what we’ve learned from MozReview.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Martes Mozilleros, 14 Mar 2017

Mozilla planet - di, 14/03/2017 - 17:00

Martes Mozilleros Reunión bi-semanal para hablar sobre el estado de Mozilla, la comunidad y sus proyectos. Bi-weekly meeting to talk (in Spanish) about Mozilla status, community and...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla: Everyone's scared of hackers but clueless about fending them off - ZDNet

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 14/03/2017 - 16:02

ZDNet

Mozilla: Everyone's scared of hackers but clueless about fending them off
ZDNet
People with strong knowledge of online privacy worry most about being tracked by state actors such as governments and law enforcement. Image: Mozilla. According to Firefox maker Mozilla, we're nearly all afraid of hackers, but few of us feel we can ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Adds Gigabit Cities - Broadcasting & Cable

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 14/03/2017 - 14:37

Broadcasting & Cable

Mozilla Adds Gigabit Cities
Broadcasting & Cable
Mozilla is committed to supporting promising projects in gigabit-enabled U.S. cities — projects that use connectivity 250-times normal speeds to make learning more engaging, equitable and impactful," said Chris Lawrence, VP, leadership network, for ...

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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Adds Gigabit Cities - Multichannel News

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 14/03/2017 - 14:36

Mozilla Adds Gigabit Cities
Multichannel News
Mozilla is committed to supporting promising projects in gigabit-enabled U.S. cities — projects that use connectivity 250-times normal speeds to make learning more engaging, equitable and impactful," said Chris Lawrence, VP, leadership network, for ...

en meer »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Christian Heilmann: Want to learn more about using the command line? Remy helps!

Mozilla planet - di, 14/03/2017 - 14:29

This is an unashamed plug for Remy Sharp’s terminal training course command line for non–techies. Go over there and have a look at what he’s lined up for a very affordable price. In a series of videos he explains all the ins and outs of the terminal and its commands that can make you much more effective in your day-to-day job.

Working the command line ebook

I’ve read the ebook of the same course and have to say that I learned quite a few things but – more importantly – remembered a lot I had forgotten. By using the findings over and over a lot has become muscle memory, but it is tough to explain what I am doing. Remy did a great job making the dark command line magic more understandable and less daunting. Here is what the course covers:

Course material “Just open the terminal”
  • Just open the terminal (03:22)
  • Why use a terminal? (03:23)
  • Navigating directories (07:71)
  • Navigation shortcuts (01:06)
Install all the things
  • Running applications (05:47)
  • brew install fun (07:46)
  • gem install (06:32)
  • npm install—global (09:44)
  • Which is best? (02:13)
Tools of the Terminal Trade
  • Connecting programs (08:25)
  • echo & cat (01:34)
  • grep “searching” (06:22)
  • head tail less (10:24)
  • sort | uniq (07:58)
How (not) to shoot yourself in the foot
  • Delete all the things (07:42)
  • Super user does…sudo (07:50)
  • Permissions: mode & owner (11:16)
  • Kill kill kill! (12:21)
  • Health checking (12:54)
Making the shell your own
  • Owning your terminal (09:19)
  • Fish ~> (10:18)
  • Themes (01:51)
  • zsh (zed shell) (10:11)
  • zsh plugins: z st… (08:26)
  • Aliases (05:43)
  • Alias++ → functions (08:15)
Furthering your command line
  • Piping workflow (08:14)
  • Setting environment values (03:04)
  • Default environment variable values (01:46)
  • Terminal editors (06:41)
  • wget and cURL (09:53)
  • ngrok for tunnelling (06:38)
  • json command for data massage (07:51)
  • awk for splitting output into columns (04:11)
  • xargs (for when pipes won’t do) (02:15)
  • …fun bonus-bonus video (04:13)

I am not getting anything for this, except for making sure that someone as lovely and dedicated as Remy may reach more people with his materials. So, take a peek.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: A Public-Private Partnership for Gigabit Innovation and Internet Health

Mozilla planet - di, 14/03/2017 - 12:18
Mozilla, the National Science Foundation and U.S. Ignite announce $300,000 in grants for gigabit internet projects in Eugene, OR and Lafayette, LA

 

By Chris Lawrence, VP, Leadership Network

At Mozilla, we believe in a networked approach — leveraging the power of diverse people, pooled expertise and shared values.

This was the approach we took nearly 15 years ago when we first launched Firefox. Our open-source browser was — and is — built by a global network of engineers, designers and open web advocates.

This is also the approach Mozilla takes when working toward its greater mission: keeping the internet healthy. We can’t build a healthy internet — one that cherishes freedom, openness and inclusion — alone. To keep the internet a global public resource, we need a network of individuals and organizations and institutions.

One such partnership is Mozilla’s ongoing collaboration with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and U.S. Ignite. We’re currently offering a $2 million prize for projects that decentralize the web. And together in 2014, we launched the Gigabit Community Fund. We committed to supporting promising projects in gigabit-enabled U.S. cities — projects that use connectivity 250-times normal speeds to make learning more engaging, equitable and impactful.

Today, we’re adding two new cities to the Gigabit Community Fund: Eugene, OR and Lafayette, LA.

 

Beginning in May 2017, we’re providing a total of $300,000 in grants to projects in both new cities. Applications for grants will open in early summer 2017; applicants can be individuals, nonprofits and for-profits.

We’ll support educators, technologists and community activists in Eugene and Lafayette who are building and beta-testing the emerging technologies that are shaping the web. We’ll fuel projects that leverage gigabit networks to make learning more inclusive and engaging through VR field trips, ultra-high definition classroom collaboration, and real-time cross-city robot battles. (These are all real examples from the existing Mozilla gigabit cities of Austin, Chattanooga and Kansas City.)

We’re also investing in the local communities on the ground in Eugene and Lafayette — and in the makers, technologists, and educators who are passionate about local innovation. Mozilla will bring its Mozilla Network approach to both cities, hosting local events and strengthening connections between individuals, schools, nonprofits, museums, and other organizations.

Video: Learn how the Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund supports innovative local projects across the U.S.

Why Eugene and Lafayette? Mozilla Community Gigabit Fund cities are selected based on a range of criteria, including a widely deployed high-speed fiber network; a developing conversation about digital literacy, access, and innovation; a critical mass of community anchor organizations, including arts and educational organizations; an evolving entrepreneurial community; and opportunities to engage K-12 school systems.

We’re excited to fuel innovation in the communities of Eugene and Lafayette  — and to continue our networked approach with NSF, U.S. Ignite and others, in service of a healthier internet.

 

The post A Public-Private Partnership for Gigabit Innovation and Internet Health appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

A Public-Private Partnership for Gigabit Innovation and Internet Health

Mozilla Blog - di, 14/03/2017 - 12:18
Mozilla, the National Science Foundation and U.S. Ignite announce $300,000 in grants for gigabit internet projects in Eugene, OR and Lafayette, LA

 

By Chris Lawrence, VP, Leadership Network

At Mozilla, we believe in a networked approach — leveraging the power of diverse people, pooled expertise and shared values.

This was the approach we took nearly 15 years ago when we first launched Firefox. Our open-source browser was — and is — built by a global network of engineers, designers and open web advocates.

This is also the approach Mozilla takes when working toward its greater mission: keeping the internet healthy. We can’t build a healthy internet — one that cherishes freedom, openness and inclusion — alone. To keep the internet a global public resource, we need a network of individuals and organizations and institutions.

One such partnership is Mozilla’s ongoing collaboration with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and U.S. Ignite. We’re currently offering a $2 million prize for projects that decentralize the web. And together in 2014, we launched the Gigabit Community Fund. We committed to supporting promising projects in gigabit-enabled U.S. cities — projects that use connectivity 250-times normal speeds to make learning more engaging, equitable and impactful.

Today, we’re adding two new cities to the Gigabit Community Fund: Eugene, OR and Lafayette, LA.

 

Beginning in May 2017, we’re providing a total of $300,000 in grants to projects in both new cities. Applications for grants will open in early summer 2017; applicants can be individuals, nonprofits and for-profits.

We’ll support educators, technologists and community activists in Eugene and Lafayette who are building and beta-testing the emerging technologies that are shaping the web. We’ll fuel projects that leverage gigabit networks to make learning more inclusive and engaging through VR field trips, ultra-high definition classroom collaboration, and real-time cross-city robot battles. (These are all real examples from the existing Mozilla gigabit cities of Austin, Chattanooga and Kansas City.)

We’re also investing in the local communities on the ground in Eugene and Lafayette — and in the makers, technologists, and educators who are passionate about local innovation. Mozilla will bring its Mozilla Network approach to both cities, hosting local events and strengthening connections between individuals, schools, nonprofits, museums, and other organizations.

Video: Learn how the Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund supports innovative local projects across the U.S.

Why Eugene and Lafayette? Mozilla Community Gigabit Fund cities are selected based on a range of criteria, including a widely deployed high-speed fiber network; a developing conversation about digital literacy, access, and innovation; a critical mass of community anchor organizations, including arts and educational organizations; an evolving entrepreneurial community; and opportunities to engage K-12 school systems.

We’re excited to fuel innovation in the communities of Eugene and Lafayette  — and to continue our networked approach with NSF, U.S. Ignite and others, in service of a healthier internet.

 

The post A Public-Private Partnership for Gigabit Innovation and Internet Health appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 173

Mozilla planet - di, 14/03/2017 - 05:00

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

This Week in Rust is openly developed on GitHub. If you find any errors in this week's issue, please submit a PR.

Updates from Rust Community News & Blog Posts Crate of the Week

This week's crate of the week is µtest, a testing framework for embedded software. Thanks to nasa42 for the suggestion.

Submit your suggestions and votes for next week!

Call for Participation

Always wanted to contribute to open-source projects but didn't know where to start? Every week we highlight some tasks from the Rust community for you to pick and get started!

Some of these tasks may also have mentors available, visit the task page for more information.

If you are a Rust project owner and are looking for contributors, please submit tasks here.

Updates from Rust Core

142 pull requests were merged in the last week.

New Contributors
  • CrazyMerlyn
  • Fabjan Sukalia
  • Gibson Fahnestock
  • Joel Gallant
  • Jonas Bushart
  • Joshua Horwitz
  • madseagames
  • Paul Daniel Faria
  • Petr Hosek
  • Tobias Schottdorf
Approved RFCs

Changes to Rust follow the Rust RFC (request for comments) process. These are the RFCs that were approved for implementation this week:

Final Comment Period

Every week the team announces the 'final comment period' for RFCs and key PRs which are reaching a decision. Express your opinions now. This week's FCPs are:

New RFCs Style RFCs

Style RFCs are part of the process for deciding on style guidelines for the Rust community and defaults for Rustfmt. The process is similar to the RFC process, but we try to reach rough consensus on issues (including a final comment period) before progressing to PRs. Just like the RFC process, all users are welcome to comment and submit RFCs. If you want to help decide what Rust code should look like, come get involved!

PRs in final comment period:

Issues in final comment period:

Other significant issues:

Upcoming Events

If you are running a Rust event please add it to the calendar to get it mentioned here. Email the Rust Community Team for access.

Rust Jobs

Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust to get your job offers listed here!

Quote of the Week

In #rustlang, None is always an Option<_>.

llogiq on Twitter.

Thanks to Johan Sigfrids for the suggestion.

Submit your quotes for next week!

This Week in Rust is edited by: nasa42, llogiq, and brson.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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