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Firefox Test Pilot: Say Hi to Send 1.1.0

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 22:23

We’re excited to announce the arrival of Send 1.1.0. Send now supports Microsoft Edge and Safari! In addition to expanded browser support, we’ve made several other improvements:

  • You can now send files from iOS (results may vary with receiving on iOS).
  • We no longer send file hashes to the server.
  • We fixed a bug that let users accidentally cancel downloads mid-stream.
  • You can now copy to clipboard from a mobile device, and we detect if copy-to-clipboard is disabled.
  • We now ship in 36 languages!

Right now we’re working on a raft of minor fixes, before moving on to larger features such as PIN protected files and multi-file uploads. We’re hoping to maintain a steady shipping schedule in the coming weeks even though we’re losing our beloved interns. I’ll post about performance and feature improvements as they ship.

Say Hi to Send 1.1.0 was originally published in Firefox Test Pilot on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: The Joy of Coding - Episode 109

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 19:00

The Joy of Coding - Episode 109 mconley livehacks on real Firefox bugs while thinking aloud.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: The Joy of Coding - Episode 109

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 19:00

The Joy of Coding - Episode 109 mconley livehacks on real Firefox bugs while thinking aloud.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Open Innovation Team: The Mozilla Information Trust Initiative: Building a movement to fight misinformation online

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 18:33

Today, we are announcing the Mozilla Information Trust Initiative (MITI) — a comprehensive effort to keep the Internet credible and healthy. Mozilla is developing products, research, and communities to battle information pollution and so-called ‘fake news’ online. And we’re seeking partners and allies to help us do so.

Here’s why.

Imagine this: Two news articles are shared simultaneously online.

The first is a deeply reported and thoroughly fact checked story from a credible news-gathering organization. Perhaps Le Monde, the Wall Street Journal, or Süddeutsche Zeitung.

The second is a false or misleading story. But the article is designed to mimic content from a credible newsroom, from its headline to its dissemination.

How do the two articles fare?

The first article — designed to inform — receives limited attention. The second article — designed for virality — accumulates shares. It exploits cognitive bias, belief echos, and algorithmic filter bubbles. It percolates across the Internet, spreading misinformation.

This isn’t a hypothetical scenario — it’s happening now in the U.S., in the U.K., in France, in Germany, and beyond. The Pope did not endorse a U.S. presidential candidate, nor does India’s 2000-rupee note contain a tracking device. But fabricated content, misleading headlines, and false context convinced millions of Internet users otherwise.

The impact of misinformation on our society is one of the most divisive, fraught, and important topics of our day. Misinformation depletes transparency and sows discord, erodes participation and trust, and saps the web’s public benefit. In short: it makes the Internet less healthy. As a result, the Internet’s ability to power democratic society suffers greatly.

This is why we’re launching MITI. We’re investing in people, programs, and projects that disrupt misinformation online.

Why Mozilla? The spread of misinformation violates nearly every tenet of the Mozilla Manifesto, our guiding doctrine. Mozilla has a long history of putting community and principles first, and devoting resources to urgent issues — our Firefox browser is just one example. Mozilla is committed to building tolerance rather than hate, and building technology that can protect individuals and the web.

So we’re drawing on the unique depth and breadth of the Mozilla Network — from journalists and technologists to policymakers and scientists — to build functional products, research, and community-based solutions.

Misinformation is a complex problem with roots in technology, cognitive science, economics, and literacy. And so the Mozilla Information Trust Initiative will focus on four areas:

Product

Mozilla’s Open Innovation team will work with like-minded technologists and artists to develop technology that combats misinformation.

Mozilla will partner with global media organizations to do this, and also double down on our existing product work in the space, like Pocket, Focus, and Coral. Coral is a Mozilla project that builds open-source tools to make digital journalism more inclusive and more engaging.

Literacy

We can’t solve misinformation with technology alone — we also need to educate and empower Internet users, as well as those leading innovative literacy initiatives.

Mozilla will develop a web literacy curriculum that addresses misinformation, and will continue investing in existing projects like the Mission: Information teaching kit.

Research

Misinformation in the digital age is a relatively new phenomenon. To solve such a thorny problem, we first need to fully understand it.

Later this year, Mozilla will be releasing original research on how misinformation impacts users’ experiences online. We will be drawing on a dataset of user-level browsing data gathered during the 2016 U.S. elections.

Creative interventions

Mozilla will field and fund pitches from technologists who are combatting misinformation using various mediums, including virtual reality and augmented reality. It’s an opportunity to apply emerging technology to one of today’s most pressing issues.

Imagine: an augmented reality web app that uses data visualization to investigate misinformation’s impact on Internet health. Or, a virtual reality experience that takes users through the history of misinformation online.

Mozilla will also support key events in this space, like Media Party Argentina, the Computation+Journalism Symposium, the Online News Association, the 22×20 summit, and a MisinfoCon in London as part of MozFest. (To learn more about MozFest — Mozilla’s annual, flagship event devoted to Internet health — visit mozillafestival.org.)

We’re hoping to hear from and work with partners who share our vision. Please reach out to Phillip Smith, Mozilla’s Senior Fellow on Media, Misinformation & Trust, at miti@mozilla.com to get involved.

More than ever, we need a network of people and organizations devoted to understanding, and combatting, misinformation online. The health of the Internet — and our societies — depends on it.

This post was originally published on The Mozilla Blog.

The Mozilla Information Trust Initiative: Building a movement to fight misinformation online was originally published in Mozilla Open Innovation on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Dzmitry Malyshau: Rusty Object Notation

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 18:11

JavaScript. The practice-oriented language made scripting the Web possible for millions of programmers. It grew an ecosystem of libraries, even started attacking the domains seemingly independent of the Web, such as: native applications (Node.js) and interchange formats (JSON).

There is a lot not to like in JSON, but the main issue here is the lack of semantics. JavaScript doesn’t differentiate between a map and a struct, so any other language using JSON has to suffer. If only we had an interchange format made for a semantically strong language, preferably modern and efficient… like Rust. Here comes Rusty Object Notation - RON.

RON aims to be a superior alternative to JSON/YAML/TOML/etc, while having consistent format and simple rules. RON is a pleasure to read and write, especially if you have 5+ years of Rust experience. It has support for structures, enums, tuples, homogeneous maps and lists, comments, and even trailing commas!

We are happy to announce the release of RON library version 0.1. The implementation uses serde for convenient (de-)serialization of your precious data. It has already been accepted as the configuration format for Amethyst engine. And we are just getting started ;)

RON has been designed a few years ago, to be used for a game no longer in development. The idea rested peacefully until one shiny day torkleyy noticed the project and brought it to life. Now the library is perfectly usable and solves the question of readable data format for all of my future projects, and I hope - yours too!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Weekly SUMO Community Meeting August 9, 2017

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 18:00

Weekly SUMO Community Meeting August 9, 2017 This is the sumo weekly call

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Bugzilla Project Meeting, 09 Aug 2017

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 18:00

Bugzilla Project Meeting The Bugzilla Project Developers meeting.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Addons Blog: Friend of Add-ons: Santosh Viswanatham

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 17:30

Our newest Friend of Add-ons is Santosh Viswanatham! Santosh attended a regional event hosted by Mozilla Rep Srikar Ananthula in 2012 and has been an active leader in the community ever since.  Having previously served as a Firefox Student Ambassador and Regional Ambassador Lead, he is currently a Tech Speaker and a member of the Mozilla Campus Clubs Advisory Committee, where he is helping develop an activity for building extensions for Firefox.

Santosh has brought his considerable enthusiasm for open source software to the add-ons community. Earlier this year, he served a six-month term as a member of the Featured Add-ons Advisory Board, where he helped nominate and select extensions to be featured on addons.mozilla.org each month. Additionally, Santosh hosted a hackathon in Hyderabad, India, where 100 developers spent the night creating more than 20 extensions.

When asked to describe his experience contributing to Mozilla, Santosh says:

“It has been a wonderful opportunity to work with like-minded incredible people. Contributing to Mozilla gave me an opportunity to explore myself and stretched my limits working around super cool technologies. I learned tons of things about technology and communities, improved my skill set, received global exposure, and made friends for a lifetime by contributing to Mozilla.”

In his free time, Santosh enjoys dining out at roadside eateries, spending time with friends, and watching TV shows and movies.

Congratulations, Santosh, and thank you for all of contributions!

Are you a contributor to the add-ons community or know of someone who should be recognized? Please be sure to add them to our Recognition Wiki!

The post Friend of Add-ons: Santosh Viswanatham appeared first on Mozilla Add-ons Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Daniel Stenberg: Some things to enjoy in curl 7.55.0

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 12:01

In this endless stream of frequent releases, the next release isn’t terribly different from the previous.

curl’s 167th release is called 7.55.0 and while the name or number isn’t standing out in any particular way, I believe this release has a few extra bells and whistles that makes it stand out a little from the regular curl releases, feature wise. Hopefully this will turn out to be a release that becomes the new “you should at least upgrade to this version” in the coming months and years.

Here are six things in this release I consider worthy some special attention. (The full changelog.)

1. Headers from file

The command line options that allows users to pass on custom headers can now read a set of headers from a given file.

2. Binary output prevention

Invoke curl on the command line, give it a URL to a binary file and see it destroy your terminal by sending all that gunk to the terminal? No more.

3. Target independent headers

You want to build applications that use libcurl and build for different architectures, such as 32 bit and 64 bit builds, using the same installed set of libcurl headers? Didn’t use to be possible. Now it is.

4. OPTIONS * support!

Among HTTP requests, this is a rare beast. Starting now, you can tell curl to send such requests.

5. HTTP proxy use cleanup

Asking curl to use a HTTP proxy while doing a non-HTTP protocol would often behave in unpredictable ways since it wouldn’t do CONNECT requests unless you added an extra instruction. Now libcurl will assume CONNECT operations for all protocols over an HTTP proxy unless you use HTTP or FTP.

6. Coverage counter

The configure script now supports the option –enable-code-coverage. We now build all commits done on github with it enabled, run a bunch of tests and measure the test coverage data it produces. How large share of our source code that is exercised by our tests. We push all coverage data to coveralls.io.

That’s a blunt tool, but it could help us identify parts of the project that we don’t test well enough. Right now it says we have a 75% coverage. While not totally bad, it’s not very impressive either.

Stats

This release ships 56 days since the previous one. Exactly 8 weeks, right on schedule. 207 commits.

This release contains 114 listed bug-fixes, including three security advisories. We list 7 “changes” done (new features basically).

We got help from 41 individual contributors who helped making this single release. Out of this bunch, 20 persons were new contributors and 24 authored patches.

283 files in the git repository were modified for this release. 51 files in the documentation tree were updated, and in the library 78 files were changed: 1032 lines inserted and 1007 lines deleted. 24 test cases were added or modified.

The top 5 commit authors in this release are:

  1. Daniel Stenberg
  2. Marcel Raad
  3. Jay Satiro
  4. Max Dymond
  5. Kamil Dudka
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Cameron Kaiser: And now for several things that are completely different: Vintage Computer Festival aftermath, I pass a POWER9 kidneystone, and isindex isdead which issad

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 07:54
So, you slugs who didn't drag yourselves to the Computer History Museum in Mountain View for this year's Vintage Computer Festival West, here's what you didn't see (and here's what you didn't see last year).

You didn't see me cram two dorm refrigerator-sized Apple servers and a CRT monitor into my Honda Civic,

you didn't see my Apple Network Server exhibit, complete with a Shiner HE prototype and twin PowerBook 2300 Duos and an Outbound notebook serving as clients, you didn't see a functioning Xerox Alto, you didn't see SDF's original AT&T 3B2, you didn't see Bil Herd, Leonard Tramiel and other old Commodore luminaries talking about then and now, you didn't see a replica "CADET" IBM 1620, "just as it was" in 1959 (the infamous system that used lookup tables for addition rather than a proper adder, hence the acronym's alternative expansion as "Can't Add, Doesn't Even Try"), you didn't see a JLPGA PowerBook 170 signed by John Sculley, you didn't see a prototype dual G4 PowerBook, you didn't see a prototype Mac mini with an iPod dock (and an amusing FAIL sticker), you didn't see components from the Cray-1 supercomputer, you didn't see this 6502-based astrology system in the consignment section, of the same model used by Nancy Reagan's astrologer Joan Quigley, and you didn't see me investigate this Gbike parked out front, possibly against company policy. You could have, if you had come. But now it's too late. Try again next year.

But what you still have a chance to see is your very own Talos II POWER9 workstation under your desk, because preorders opened today. Now, a reminder: I don't work for Raptor, I don't get any money from Raptor, and I paid retail; I'm just a fairly intransigent PowerPC bigot who is willing to put my Visa card where my mouth is.

Currently on its way to my doorstep is a two-CPU, octocore (each core is SMT-4, so that's 32 threads) Sforza POWER9 Talos II with 32GB of DDR4 ECC RAM, an AMD Radeon Pro WX7100, a 500GB NVMe SSD and an LSI 9300 8-port internal SAS controller. The system comes standard with a case, eight SAS/SATA bays, EATX motherboard, fans for each CPU, dual 1400W redundant PSUs, USB 3.0 and 2.0, RS-232, VGA, Blu-ray optical drive, dual Gigabit Ethernet, five PCIe slots (PCIe 4.0, 3 x16 and 2 x8) and a recovery disc. It runs Linux on ppc64le, which is fully supported. The total cost shipped to my maildrop with a hex driver for the high-speed fan assemblies is $7236.

Now, some of you are hyperventilating by now and a few of you may have gone into frank sticker shock. Before you reach for the Xanax, please remember this is most assuredly not a commodity x86_64 machine; this is a different (and Power ISA successor) architecture with fully auditable firmware, the ability for you to do your own upgrades and service with off-the-shelf parts, and no binary blobs with hidden spies like the Intel Management Engine. This is a niche box for people like us who value alternative architectures, especially in a design that we can build and trust ourselves, and I always said something like this wouldn't come cheap. But let's compare and say you're in the market for a Mac Pro or something. You'll still be paying a lot, especially if you get any of the tasty BTO options, and the next Mac Pro is still months away or more. And if you were actually in the market for an AmigaOne X5000, this blows it out of the water. You could just run UAE on this and have cycles to spare!

When the Talos II arrives, I'll be sure to post some unboxing photos and take it through its paces on first boot and give you some initial impressions. My immediate goal is to get a RAID set up, get QEMU able to run a decent subset of my old Mac software (I'll probably start with OS 9, and then create a Tiger instance or clone the G5 to it), and get Firefox running with compiler settings appropriate to the CPU. Then will come the real fun of writing a JavaScript JIT for POWER9.

But don't worry: the G5 isn't going anywhere and neither is TenFourFox. I've got a lot invested in this Quad and it will still be serving workstation duty for awhile yet. Nevertheless, get your credit card and your intestinal fortitude out in the meantime and reserve a Talos of your own while the pre-order period is open. Time to get in while it's hot. This is the next evolutionary step in personal computing with PowerPC.

As we wind up our discussion of the future, however, one part of the past will soon be almost completely gone: the venerable old <isindex> HTML tag. Firefox will be removing it from 56 for technical reasons after it was already removed from Google Chrome and the Safari preview. This construct dates back to the very earliest days of the Web when early browsers didn't have form support; it was designed as an easy way of enabling the user to send search keywords or parameters to a webserver, much like Gopher servers receive queries over item type 7. Mosaic 1.x even had a little form that was a permanent part of the browser chrome with a search button, as you can see from the screenshot at the Macintosh Repository, which would be activated when the tag was seen. Later on, subsequent versions of Mosaic and most of the successor browsers turned it into a pseudo-form that functioned the same way as far as the server is concerned and some of those sites are still around. Myself I use the tag mostly as a convenience for old browsers and Lynx on the Hytelnet-HTTP gateway; the search system offers both a conventional search form and an <isindex> query, both of which work the same, and both of which can still be seen in 52ESR, 54 and the 55 beta for the time being. It goes without saying that I will not be removing it from TenFourFox, and it will eternally remain in our codebase and on my servers as a relic of the way things were and an echo of the way the early Web was.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Michael Verdi: New download and install flow for Firefox 55

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 01:39

It’s been quite a while (January!) since I posted an update about the onboarding work we’ve been doing. If you’ve been using Nightly or read any of the Photon Engineering newsletters, you may have seen the new user tour we’re building but onboarding encompasses much more than that and we shipped some important pieces in Firefox 55 today.

The experiment we ran back in February (along with a follow up in May) went really well*. We had 4 important successes:

  1. The changes to the installer resulted in 8% more installs (that’s unheard of!).
  2. We retained 2.4% more of the people who went through our new experience. (combined with the installer change that means 10.6% more people using Firefox).
  3. Ratings for the new flow were on par with ratings of the existing flow. In addition, in user research, participants responded positively to the art on the new download page and installer and some were delighted by the animation on the firstrun page.

     
    I thought it was really cute. Especially the little sunrise at the beginning. That was precious. I thought it was kind of ingenious. It kind of implied that you’re using a product that’s pulling you into the light. Something like that. It was a cute little interactive feature which I really enjoyed.
    – Research participant

  4. Changing the /firstrun page to a sign in flow instead of a sign up flow resulted in a 14.8% increase in people ending up with second device connected to sync (which is the whole point of sync).

So today with Firefox 55 we shipped a new streamlined installer, we moved the default browser ask to the second session and we now open the privacy notice in a second tab instead of displaying a bottom notification bar. These changes join the new download and firstrun pages that shipped 2 weeks ago.

Here’s a quick video of Firefox 55 in action.


Planet Mozilla viewers – you can watch this video on YouTube (1 min.).

It is not an easy feat to build a whole new flow that cuts a swath across internal organizations and I’m incredibly proud of the work our team did to get here. And there’s a lot more to come (like that new user tour) that I’ll outline in another post.

*We weren’t able to properly test the automigration feature (automatically importing your stuff from another browser) back in February because of underlying performance issues that we discovered in the migration tool. We fixed many of the performance issues with migration but a subsequent test revealed that they haven’t all been fixed. Sadly, in a flow where we do this silently, some people just experiences a janky, slow Firefox. So we’re not going to ship automigration for now and instead we’re going to replace the modal import wizard on startup with a non-modal message embedded in Activity Stream beginning in Firefox 57.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: The Mozilla Information Trust Initiative: Building a movement to fight misinformation online

Mozilla planet - wo, 09/08/2017 - 00:36

Today, we are announcing the Mozilla Information Trust Initiative (MITI)—a comprehensive effort to keep the Internet credible and healthy. Mozilla is developing products, research, and communities to battle information pollution and so-called ‘fake news’ online. And we’re seeking partners and allies to help us do so.

Here’s why.

Imagine this: Two news articles are shared simultaneously online.

The first is a deeply reported and thoroughly fact checked story from a credible news-gathering organization. Perhaps Le Monde, the Wall Street Journal, or Süddeutsche Zeitung.

The second is a false or misleading story. But the article is designed to mimic content from a credible newsroom, from its headline to its dissemination.

How do the two articles fare?

The first article—designed to inform—receives limited attention. The second article—designed for virality—accumulates shares. It exploits cognitive bias, belief echos, and algorithmic filter bubbles. It percolates across the Internet, spreading misinformation.

This isn’t a hypothetical scenario—it’s happening now in the U.S., in the U.K., in France, in Germany, and beyond. The Pope did not endorse a U.S. presidential candidate, nor does India’s 2000-rupee note contain a tracking device. But fabricated content, misleading headlines, and false context convinced millions of Internet users otherwise.

The impact of misinformation on our society is one of the most divisive, fraught, and important topics of our day. Misinformation depletes transparency and sows discord, erodes participation and trust, and saps the web’s public benefit. In short: it makes the Internet less healthy. As a result, the Internet’s ability to power democratic society suffers greatly.

This is why we’re launching MITI. We’re investing in people, programs, and projects that disrupt misinformation online.

Why Mozilla? The spread of misinformation violates nearly every tenet of the Mozilla Manifesto, our guiding doctrine. Mozilla has a long history of putting community and principles first, and devoting resources to urgent issues—our Firefox browser is just one example. Mozilla is committed to building tolerance rather than hate, and building technology that can protect individuals and the web.

So we’re drawing on the unique depth and breadth of the Mozilla Network—from journalists and technologists to policymakers and scientists—to build functional products, research, and community-based solutions.

Misinformation is a complex problem with roots in technology, cognitive science, economics, and literacy. And so the Mozilla Information Trust Initiative will focus on four areas:

Product

Mozilla’s Open Innovation team will work with like-minded technologists and artists to develop technology that combats misinformation.

Mozilla will partner with global media organizations to do this, and also double down on our existing product work in the space, like Pocket, Focus, and Coral. Coral is a Mozilla project that builds open-source tools to make digital journalism more inclusive and more engaging.

Literacy

We can’t solve misinformation with technology alone—we also need to educate and empower Internet users, as well as those leading innovative literacy initiatives.

Mozilla will develop a web literacy curriculum that addresses misinformation, and will continue investing in existing projects like the Mission: Information teaching kit.

Research

Misinformation in the digital age is a relatively new phenomenon. To solve such a thorny problem, we first need to fully understand it.

Later this year, Mozilla will be releasing original research on how misinformation impacts users’ experiences online. We will be drawing on a dataset of user-level browsing data gathered during the 2016 U.S. elections.

Creative interventions

Mozilla will field and fund pitches from technologists who are combatting misinformation using various mediums, including virtual reality and augmented reality. It’s an opportunity to apply emerging technology to one of today’s most pressing issues.

Imagine: an augmented reality web app that uses data visualization to investigate misinformation’s impact on Internet health. Or, a virtual reality experience that takes users through the history of misinformation online.

Mozilla will also support key events in this space, like Media Party Argentina, the Computation+Journalism Symposium, the Online News Association, the 22×20 summit, and a MisinfoCon in London as part of MozFest. (To learn more about MozFest — Mozilla’s annual, flagship event devoted to Internet health — visit mozillafestival.org.)

We’re hoping to hear from and work with partners who share our vision. Please reach out to Phillip Smith, Mozilla’s Senior Fellow on Media, Misinformation & Trust, at miti@mozilla.com to get involved.

More than ever, we need a network of people and organizations devoted to understanding, and combatting, misinformation online. The health of the Internet — and our societies — depends on it.

The post The Mozilla Information Trust Initiative: Building a movement to fight misinformation online appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Princi Vershwal: Getting into Outreachy : An open source internship program.

Mozilla planet - di, 08/08/2017 - 21:09

What is Outreachy?

Outreachy is a wonderful initiative for women and people from groups underrepresented in free and open source software to get involved. If you are new to open source and searching for an internship that can boost up your confidence in open source, Outreachy would be a great start for you.

Outreachy interns work on a project for an organization under the supervision of a mentor, for 3 months. Various open source organizations(e.g. Mozilla, GNOME, Wikimedia, Linux kernel to name a few) take part in the Outreachy program. It is similar to the Google Summer of Code program, but a difference is that participation isn’t limited to just students.

Another major difference is that it happens twice a year. There are both summer and winter rounds. So you don’t have to wait for the entire year but you can start contributing anytime and prepare for the next round which would be some months later.

My involvement with Outreachy

Before Outreachy, I had done web and android development projects in my college but I was new to the huge world of open source. My first encounter with open source was in November last year and at that time Outreachy was nowhere in my mind.

I heard about the program in through a college senior who has earlier participated in Outreachy. I decided to participate in the coming round and started solving good-first-bugs.

The application period itself gave me a lot of confidence in my skills and work as a developer. I enjoyed it so much that I used to spend my whole day solving bugs here and there or just reading blogs about the program or the participating organizations.

Finally, there was the result day and I was selected for an internship at Mozilla for round 14.

I am currently working on Push Notifications for Signin Confirmation in Firefox Accounts. I am really enjoying my work. It is super exciting!!

Applying for Outreachy?

If you are planning to apply for the next round of Outreachy, here’s some advice that I can offer:

Start early

It is always better to know what is coming up. Try to explore as much as you can before the organizations and projects are announced. If you are a beginner, read about Outreachy, previously participated organizations, and start making contributions. You will learn a lot while contributing.

Chose your project/organization wisely

Once the organizations are announced you will be having about 50 projects(from different organization, programming languages, and fields) to choose from, this is great because you can start contributing to the project you are most interested in.

Explore all the projects and choose one which interests you the most and you feel motivated to work on that project for the next 3–4 months.

Ask Questions

Do not hesitate in asking questions even if you think that the question is silly because that one small question can be a block for many days, first search for the solution yourself but if it takes more than a day or two just ask. Outreachy respects the fact that you might be a beginner and everybody is going to respond to your query respectfully.

If it is an issue/project related doubt ask the mentors, otherwise for any Outreachy related query you can join the #outreachy channel on IRC.

Stay consistent

There can be days when you face block after block but stay motivated and don’t stop trying. Don’t get disheartened if your patches are not accepted in early stages. Eventually they would be. They just need a little more polishing. Keep going and one day you will get your PR merged!! :)

Be respectful

Always be respectful to your mentors and co participants while communicating. If you see that any fellow participant is stuck on a similar doubt and you feel that you can help, just share your knowledge even if he/she is your competitor. Getting selected is a goal but spreading knowledge and involving more people in open source is a bigger aim of Outreachy.

Know your project before submitting an application

You do not have to hurry about submitting a proposal. Get to know about your project, set up the platform, solve bugs and once you get comfortable with the code and platform then submit the application. This way you will have a better idea about the project and this will reflect from your application.

Don’t get disheartened and learn from the past mistakes

If you do not get selected for one round of Outreachy don’t be upset. Keep in mind that the next round is just a few months away and the chances of you getting selected in the next round will just get double if you keep contributing.

If you have any other query regarding Outreachy feel free to drop me an email at vershwal.princi@gmail.com.
Happy coding!!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Firefox 55: first desktop browser to support WebVR

Mozilla planet - di, 08/08/2017 - 15:01
WebVR Support on Desktop

Firefox on Windows is the first desktop browser to support the new WebVR standard (and macOS support is in Nightly!). As the originators of WebVR, Mozilla wanted it to embody the same principles of standardization, openness, and interoperability that are hallmarks of the Web, which is why WebVR works on any device: Vive, Rift, and beyond.

To learn more, check out vr.mozilla.org, or dive into A-Frame, an open source framework for building immersive VR experiences on the Web.

New Features for Developers

Firefox 55 supports several new ES2017/2018 features, including async generators and the rest/spread (“...“) operator for objects:

let a = { foo: 1, bar: 2 }; let b = { bar: 'two' }; let c = { ...a, ...b }; // { foo: 1, bar: 'two' };

MDN has great documentation on using ... with object literals or for destructuring assignment, and the TC39 proposal also provides a concise overview of this feature.

Over in DevTools, the Network panel now supports filtering results with queries like “status-code:200“.

304, and a pop-up showing the new columns that are available.

There are also new, optional columns for cookies, protocol, scheme, and more that can be hidden or shown inside the Network panel, as seen in the screenshot above.

Making Firefox Faster

We’ve implemented several new features to keep Firefox itself running quickly:

  • New installations of Firefox on Windows will now default to the more stable and secure 64-bit version. Existing installations will upgrade to 64-bit with our next release, Firefox 56.
  • Restoring a session or restarting Firefox with many tabs open is now an order of magnitude faster. For reasons unknown, Dietrich Ayala has a Firefox profile with 1,691 open tabs. With Firefox 54, starting up his instance of Firefox took 300 seconds and 2 GB of memory. Today, with Firefox 55, it takes just 15 seconds and 0.5 GB of memory. This improvement is primarily thanks to the tireless work of an external contributor, Kevin Jones, who virtually eliminated the fixed costs associated with restoring tabs.
  • Users can now adjust Firefox’s number of content processes from within Preferences. Multiple content processes debuted in Firefox 54, and allow Firefox to take better advantage of modern, multi-core CPUs, while still being respectful of RAM utilization.
  • Firefox now uses its built-in Tracking Protection lists to identify and throttle tracking scripts running in background pages. After a short grace period, Firefox will increase the minimum setInterval or setTimeout for callbacks scheduled by tracking scripts to 10 seconds while the tab is in the background. This is in addition to our usual 1 second throttling for background tabs, and helps ensure that unused tabs can’t invisibly ruin performance or battery life. Of course, tabs that are playing audio or video are not throttled, so music in a background tab won’t stutter.
  • With the announcement of Flash’s end of life, and in coordination with Microsoft and Google, Firefox 55 now requires users to explicitly click to activate Flash on web pages as we work together toward completely removing Flash from the Web platform in 2020.
Making the Web Faster

Firefox 55 introduces several new low-level capabilities that help improve the performance of demanding web applications:

See the Pen Hello IntersectionObserver by Dan Callahan (@callahad) on CodePen.

  • SharedArrayBuffer and Atomics objects are new JavaScript primitives that allow workers to share and simultaneously access the same memory. This finally makes efficient multi-threading a reality on the Web. The only downside? Developers have to care about thread safety, mutexes, etc. when sharing memory, just like in any other multi-threaded language. You can learn more about SharedArrayBuffer in this code cartoon introduction and this explainer article from last year.
  • The requestIdleCallback() API offers a new way to schedule callbacks whenever the browser has a few extra, unused milliseconds between frames, or whenever a maximum timeout has elapsed. This makes it possible to squeeze work into the margins where the browser would otherwise be idle, and to defer lower priority work while the browser is busy. Using this API requires a bit of finesse, but MDN has great documentation on how to use requestIdleCallback() effectively.
Making the Web More Secure

Geolocation and Storage join the ranks of powerful APIs like Service Workers that are only allowed on secure, https:// origins. If your site needs a TLS certificate, consider Let’s Encrypt: a completely free, automated, and non-profit Certificate Authority.

Additionally, Firefox 55 will not allow plug-ins to load from or on non-HTTP/S schemes, such as file:.

New WebExtension APIs

WebExtensions can now:

And more…

There are many more changes in the works as we get ready for the next era of Firefox in November. Some users of Firefox 55 will begin seeing our new Firefox Screenshots feature, the Bookmarks / History sidebar can now be docked on either side of the browser, and we just announced three new Test Pilot experiments.

For a complete overview of what’s new, refer to the official Release Notes, MDN’s Firefox 55 for Developers, and the Mozilla Blog announcement .

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: Firefox Is Better, For You. WebVR and new speedy features launching today in Firefox

Mozilla planet - di, 08/08/2017 - 14:59

Perhaps you’re starting to see a pattern – we’re working furiously to make Firefox faster and better than ever. And today we’re shipping a new release that’s our best yet, one that introduces exciting, empowering new technologies for creators as well as improves the everyday experience for all Firefox users.

Here’s what’s new today:

WebVR opens up a whole new world for the WWW

On top of Firefox’s new super-fast multi-process foundation, today we’re launching a breakthrough feature that expands the web to an entirely new experience. Firefox for Windows is the first desktop browser to support WebVR for all users, letting you experience next-generation entertainment in virtual reality.

WebVR enables developers and artists to create web-based VR experiences you can browse to with Firefox. So whether you’re a current Oculus Rift or HTC Vive owner – or still deciding when you’re going to take the VR leap – Firefox can get you to your VR fix faster. Once you find a web game or app that supports VR, you can experience it with your headset just by clicking the VR goggles icon visible on the web page. You can navigate and control VR experiences with handset controllers and your movements in physical space.

For a look at what WebVR can do, check out this sizzle reel (retro intro intended!).

If you’re ready to try out VR with Firefox, a growing community of creators has already been building content with WebVR. Visit vr.mozilla.org to find some experiences we recommend, many made with A-Frame, an easy-to-use WebVR content creation framework made by Mozilla.. One of our favorites is A Painter, a VR painting experience. None of this would have been possible without the hard work of the Mozilla VR team, who collaborated with industry partners, fellow browser makers and the developer community to create and adopt the WebVR specification. If you’d like to learn more about the history and capabilities of WebVR, check out this Medium post by Sean White.

Performance Panel – fine-tune browser performance

Our new multi-process architecture allows Firefox to easily handle complex websites, particularly when you have many of them loaded in tabs. We believe we’ve struck a good balance for most computers, but for those of you who are tinkerers, you can now adjust the number of processes up or down in this version of Firefox. This setting is at the bottom of the General section in Options.

Tip: if your computer has lots of RAM (e.g., more than 8GB), you might want to try bumping up the number of content processes that Firefox uses from its default four. This can make Firefox even faster, although it will use more memory than it does with four processes. But, in our tests on Windows 10, Firefox uses less memory than Chrome, even with eight content processes running.

Faster startup when restoring lots of tabs

Are you a tab hoarder? As part of our Quantum Flow project to improve performance, we’ve significantly reduced the time it takes to start Firefox when restoring tabs from a previous session. Just how much faster are things now? Mozillian Dietrich Ayala ran an interesting experiment, comparing how long it takes to start various versions of Firefox with a whopping 1,691 tabs open. The end result? What used to take nearly eight minutes, now takes just 15 seconds.

A faster and more stable Firefox for 64-bit Windows

If you’re running the 64-bit version of Windows (here’s how to check), you might want to download and reinstall Firefox today. That’s because new downloads on 64-bit Windows will install the 64-bit version of Firefox, which is much less prone to running out of memory and crashing. In our tests so far, the 64-bit version of Firefox reduces crashes by 39% on machines with 4GB of RAM.

If you don’t manually upgrade, no worries. We intend to automatically migrate 64-bit Windows users to 64-bit Firefox in our next release.

A faster way to search

We’re all searching for something. Sometimes that thing is a bit of information – like a fact you can glean from Wikipedia. Or, maybe it’s a product you hope to find on Amazon, or a video on YouTube.

With today’s Firefox release, you can quickly search using many websites’ search engines, right from the address bar. Just type your query, and then click which search engine you’d like to use.

Out of the box, you can easily search with Yahoo, Google, Bing, Amazon, DuckDuckGo, Twitter, and Wikipedia. You can customize this list of search engines in settings.

Even more

Here are a few more interesting improvements shipping today:

  • Parts of a web page that use Flash must now be clicked and given permission to run. This improves battery life, security, and stability, and is a step towards Flash end-of-life.
  • You can now move the sidebar to the right side of the window.
  • Firefox for Android is now translated in Greek and Lao.
  • Simplify print jobs from within print preview.

As usual, you can see everything new in the release notes, and developers can read about new APIs on the Mozilla Hacks Blog.

We’ll keep cranking away – much more to come!

 

 

The post Firefox Is Better, For You. WebVR and new speedy features launching today in Firefox appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 194

Mozilla planet - di, 08/08/2017 - 06:00

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

This Week in Rust is openly developed on GitHub. If you find any errors in this week's issue, please submit a PR.

Updates from Rust Community News & Blog Posts Crate of the Week

This week's crate is aesni, a crate providing a Rust AES (Rijndael) block ciphers implementation using AES-NI. Thanks to newpavlov for the suggestion.

Submit your suggestions and votes for next week!

Call for Participation

Always wanted to contribute to open-source projects but didn't know where to start? Every week we highlight some tasks from the Rust community for you to pick and get started!

Some of these tasks may also have mentors available, visit the task page for more information.

If you are a Rust project owner and are looking for contributors, please submit tasks here.

Updates from Rust Core

105 pull requests were merged in the last week

New Contributors
  • Eric Daniels
  • Mario Idival
  • Ryan Leckey
  • scalexm
  • Tobias Schaffner
  • Tymoteusz Jankowski
Approved RFCs

Changes to Rust follow the Rust RFC (request for comments) process. These are the RFCs that were approved for implementation this week:

No RFCs were approved this week.

Final Comment Period

Every week the team announces the 'final comment period' for RFCs and key PRs which are reaching a decision. Express your opinions now. This week's FCPs are:

New RFCs Style RFCs

Style RFCs are part of the process for deciding on style guidelines for the Rust community and defaults for Rustfmt. The process is similar to the RFC process, but we try to reach rough consensus on issues (including a final comment period) before progressing to PRs. Just like the RFC process, all users are welcome to comment and submit RFCs. If you want to help decide what Rust code should look like, come get involved!

The RFC style is now the default style in Rustfmt - try it out and let us know what you think!

Currently being discussed:

Upcoming Events

If you are running a Rust event please add it to the calendar to get it mentioned here. Email the Rust Community Team for access.

Rust Jobs

No jobs listed for this week.

Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust to get your job offers listed here!

Quote of the Week

Nah, it's not you, it's the borrow checker.

Honey, it's not you, it's &mut me.

You can borrow me, and you can change me, but you can't own me.

/u/staticassert, /u/ybx, and /u/paholg on reddit.

Thanks to Matt Ickstadt and QuadDamaged for the suggestion.

Submit your quotes for next week!

This Week in Rust is edited by: nasa42, llogiq, and brson.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Marketing Engineering & Ops Blog: MozMEAO SRE Status Report - August 8, 2017

Mozilla planet - di, 08/08/2017 - 02:00

Here’s what happened on the MozMEAO SRE team from August 1st - August 8th.

Current work MDN Migration to AWS Virginia and EUW cluster decommissioning Upcoming Portland Deis 1 cluster decommissioning

The Deis 1 cluster in Portland is tentatively scheduled to be decommissioned next week.

Links
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Marketing Engineering & Ops Blog: Kuma Report, July 2017

Mozilla planet - di, 08/08/2017 - 02:00

Here’s what happened in July in Kuma, the engine of MDN Web Docs:

  • Shipped the new design to all users
  • Shipped the sample database
  • Shipped tweaks and fixes

Here’s the plan for August:

  • Continue the redesign and interactive examples
  • Update localization of macros
  • Establish maintenance mode in AWS
Done in July Shipped the New Design to All Users

In June, we revealed the new MDN web docs design to beta testers. In July, Stephanie Hobson and Schalk Neethling fixed many bugs, adjusted styles, shipped the homepage redesign, and answered a lot of feedback. The new design was shipped to all MDN Web Docs users on July 25, and the old design files were retired.

The redesign was a big change, with some interesting problems that called for creative solutions. For details, see Stephanie’s blog post, The MDN Redesign “Behind the Scenes”.

Shipped the Sample Database

The sample database project, started in May 2016, finally shipped in July.

Data is an important part of Kuma development. With the code and backing services you get the home page, and not much else. To develop features or test changes, you often need wiki pages, historical revisions, waffle flags, constance settings, tags, search topics, users and groups. Staff developers could download a 2 GB anonymized production database, wait 30 minutes for it to load, and then they would have a useful dev environment. Contributors had to manually copy data from production, and usually didn’t bother. The sample database has a small but representative data set, suitable for 90% of development tasks, and takes less than a minute to download and install.

The sample database doesn’t have all the data on MDN, to keep it small. There are now scraping tools for adding more production data to your development database. This is especially useful for development and testing of KumaScript macros, which often require specific pages.

Finally, integration testing is challenging because non-trivial testing requires some known data to be present, such as specific pages and editor accounts. Now, a testing deployment can combine new code with the sample database, and automated browser-based tests can verify new and old functionality. Some tests can change the data, and the sample data can be reloaded to a known state for the next test.

Shipped Tweaks and Fixes

There were many PRs merged in July:

Some highlights:

Planned for August Continue the redesign and the interactive examples

We’ve established the new look-and-feel of MDN on the homepage and article pages, and will continue to tweak the design for corner cases and bugs. For the next phase, we’ll look at the content of article pages, and consider better ways to display information and to navigate within and between pages. It is harder to change these aspects than global headers and footers, so it may be a while before you see the fruits of this design process.

Work continues on the interactive examples. They have gone through several review and bug fix cycles, and have a working production deployment system. There’s been interest and work to enable contributions (Issue 99). In August, we’ll launch user testing, and enable the new examples for beta testers. See the projects page for the remaining work.

Update Localization of Macros

Currently, KumaScript macros use in-macro localization strings and utility functions like getLocalString to localize output for three to five languages. Meanwhile, user interface strings in Kuma are translated in Pontoon into 57 languages. We’d like to use a similar workflow for strings in macros.

In August, we’ll assemble the toolchain for localizing strings at render time, and for extracting the localizable strings for translation in Pontoon. Converting the macros to use localizable strings will be a long process, but there’s a lot of community interest in translations, so we should get some help.

Establish Maintenance Mode in AWS

Over the past 12 months, we’ve made some changes to MDN development, such as switching to a Docker development environment, moving Kumascript macros to Github, and getting our browser-based integration tests working. There are benefits to each of these, but they were chosen because they move us closer to our long term goal of serving MDN from AWS. We’ve slowly filled out our tech tree from our AWS plan:

AWS Plan, July 2017

In August, we plan to prepare a maintenance mode deployment in AWS, and send some production traffic to it. This will allow us to model the resources needed when the production environment is hosted in AWS. It will also keep MDN data available while the production database is transferred, when we finalize the transition.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Mozilla Weekly Project Meeting, 07 Aug 2017

Mozilla planet - ma, 07/08/2017 - 20:00

Mozilla Weekly Project Meeting The Monday Project Meeting

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Hacks.Mozilla.Org: WebVR for All Windows Users

Mozilla planet - ma, 07/08/2017 - 16:53

With the release of Firefox 55 on August 8, Mozilla is pleased to make WebVR 1.1 available for all 64-bit Windows users with an Oculus Rift or HTC VIVE headset. Since we first announced this feature two months ago, we’ve seen tremendous growth in the tooling, art content, and applications being produced for WebVR – check out some highlights in this showcase video:

Sketchfab also just announced support for exporting their 3D models into the glTF format and have over 100,000 models available for free download under Creative Commons licensing, so it’s easier to bring high-quality art assets into your WebVR scenes with libraries such three.js and Babylon.js and know that they will just work.

They are also one of the first sites to take advantage of WebVR to make an animated short and highlight the openness of URLs to support link traversal to build awesome in-VR experiences within web content.

The growth in numbers of new users having their first experiences with WebVR content has been phenomenal as well. In the last month, we have seen over 13 million uses of the A-Frame library, started here at Mozilla to make it easier for web developers, designers and people of all backgrounds to create WebVR content.

We can’t wait to see what you will build with WebVR. Please show off what you’re doing by tweeting to @MozillaVR or saying hi in the WebVR Slack.

Stay tuned for an upcoming A-Frame contest announcement with even more opportunities to learn, experiment, and get feedback!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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