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Resignation as co-chair of the Digital Economy Board of Advisors

Mitchell Baker - fr, 18/08/2017 - 21:12

For the past year and a half I have been serving as one of two co-chairs of the U.S. Commerce Department Digital Economy Board of Advisors. The Board was appointed in March 2016 by then-Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzer to serve a two year term. On Thursday I sent the letter below to Secretary Ross.

Dear Secretary Ross,
I am resigning from my position as a member and co-chair of the Commerce Department’s Digital Economy Board of Advisors, effective immediately.
It is the responsibility of leaders to take action and lift up each and every American. Our leaders must unequivocally denounce bigotry, racism, sexism, hate, and violence.
The digital economy is fundamental to creating an economy that offers opportunity to all Americans. It has been an honor to serve as member and co-chair of this board and to work with the Commerce Department staff.
Sincerely,
Mitchell Baker
Executive Chairwoman
Mozilla

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Webdev Beer and Tell: August 2017, 18 Aug 2017

Mozilla planet - fr, 18/08/2017 - 20:00

 August 2017 Once a month web developers across the Mozilla community get together (in person and virtually) to share what cool stuff we've been working on in...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Webdev Beer and Tell: August 2017, 18 Aug 2017

Mozilla planet - fr, 18/08/2017 - 20:00

 August 2017 Once a month web developers across the Mozilla community get together (in person and virtually) to share what cool stuff we've been working on in...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Webdev Beer and Tell: August 2017, 18 Aug 2017

Mozilla planet - fr, 18/08/2017 - 20:00

 August 2017 Once a month web developers across the Mozilla community get together (in person and virtually) to share what cool stuff we've been working on in...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Firefox Test Pilot: Notes Updates

Mozilla planet - fr, 18/08/2017 - 19:26

The Notes experiment became available earlier this month as part of the Firefox Test Pilot program.

https://medium.com/media/4868fff638ea67d1bb96481a159ed03e/href

We have a new updated version of Notes (v1.7.0) available today. If you are already a Notes user you should automatically get this update!

Here are some notable improvements in this new version:

New Keyboard Shortcut

Use “Alt+Shift+W” to open the Notes sidebar easily.

To remember the shortcut think of “W” as a shortcut for “Write some notes”.

New Dark Theme Option

The new Dark theme allows the Notes sidebar to better blend in with the Firefox dark theme or stand out more starkly next to light-colored websites. You can switch the themes in the Firefox Notes add-on preferences.

Firefox Notes add-on preferences pane

We are still working on bringing the Note syncing feature to you and will notify you once that feature becomes available. If you have feature suggestions or want to contribute to the Notes project please visit the GitHub repository.

Don’t forget to take our Notes survey to help us improve this product. You can follow the changelog to keep up with the latest updates.

Notes Updates was originally published in Firefox Test Pilot on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Karl Dubost: About Publishing Code Benchmarks

Mozilla planet - fr, 18/08/2017 - 02:20

We often see code benchmarks. Some browser X HTML renderer is faster than browser Y renderer. Some JavaScript engine outperforms the competition by two folds.

While these benchmarks give a kind of instant gratification for the product, they always make me dubious coming from anyone. If the target is to outperform another browser, then I sense that nothing useful has really been accomplished. Even as a marketing technique, I don't think it's working.

When/if publishing a benchmark, focus on three things:

  • How this new code outperform the previous versions of the code? It's good to show that we care about our product and that we want to be faster where/when it matters.
  • How does this improve the user experience on some specific sites? Improving speed in controled environment like benchmarks is nice, but improving speed on real cases Web site is even better. Did it make the JavaScript-controled scrolling faster and smoother?
  • How did we get there? What are the steps which have been taken to improve the code performance? The coding tricks and techniques used to make it faster.

These will be benchmarks blog posts I like to read. So as a summary

Good benchmarks show 1. Outperform your own code 2. Real websites improvement demos 3. Give Technical explanations.

Otsukare!

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Mozilla ramps up delivery of 64-bit version of Firefox for Windows - Computerworld

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 17/08/2017 - 22:12

Computerworld

Mozilla ramps up delivery of 64-bit version of Firefox for Windows
Computerworld
Mozilla now automatically delivers the 64-bit version of Firefox to Windows users with compatible hardware, the open-source developer said this week. (Firefox ...

en meer »Google Nieuws
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Air Mozilla: Intern Presentations: Round 5: Thursday, August 17th

Mozilla planet - to, 17/08/2017 - 22:00

 Thursday, August 17th Intern Presentations 7 presenters Time: 1:00PM - 2:45PM (PDT) - each presenter will start every 15 minutes 3 SF, 1 TOR, 1 PDX, 2 Paris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Software-update: Mozilla Firefox 55.0.2 - Tweakers

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 16/08/2017 - 21:24

Tweakers

Software-update: Mozilla Firefox 55.0.2
Tweakers
Mozilla Firefox 2013 logo (75 pix) Mozilla heeft een tweede update voor versie 55 van zijn webbrowser Firefox uitgebracht. Nieuw in versie 55 is onder meer de ondersteuning voor WebVR, zijn er verbeteringen aangebracht in de zoekbalk, zien we enkele ...

en meer »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Christian Heilmann: Taking a break – and so should you

Mozilla planet - wo, 16/08/2017 - 16:59

TL;DR: I am going on holiday for a week and don’t take any computer with me. When I’m back I will cut down on my travels, social media and conference participation and focus more on coaching others, writing and developing with a real production focus.

Sleeping dogLarry shows how it is done

You won’t hear much from me in the next week or so as I am taking a well-deserved vacation. I’m off to take my partner to the Cayman Islands to visit friends who have a house with a spare room as hotels started to feel like work for me. I’m also making the conscious decision to not take any computer with me as I will be tempted to do work whilst I am there. Which would be silly.

Having just been in a lot of meetings with other DevRel people and a great event about it I found a pattern: we all have no idea how to measure our success and feel oddly unsatisfied if not worried about this. And we are all worried about keeping up to do date in a daily changing market.

I’m doing OK on both of these, but I also suffer from the same worries. Furthermore, I am disturbed about the gap between what we talk about at events and workshops and what gets released in the market afterwards.

The huge gap between publication and application

We have all the information what not to do to create engaging, fast and reliable solutions. We have all the information how to even automate some of these to not disrupt fast development processes. And yet I feel a massive lack of longevity or maintainability in all the products I see and use. I even see a really disturbing re-emergence of “this only needs to work on browser $x and platform $y” thinking. As if the last decade hadn’t happened. Business decisions dictate what goes into production, less so what we get excited about.

Even more worrying is security. We use a lot of third party code, give it full access to machines and fail to keep it up-to-date. We also happily use new and untested code in production even when the original developers state categorically that it shouldn’t be used in that manner.

When it comes to following the tech news I see us tumbling in loops. Where in the past there was a monthly cadence of interesting things to come out, more readily available publication channels and a “stream of news” mentality makes it a full-time job just to keep up with what’s happening.

Many thoughtpieces show up in several newsletters and get repurposed even if the original authors admitted in commentary that they were wrong. A lot is about being new and fast, not about being right.

There is also a weird premature productisation happening. When JavaScript, Browsers and the web weren’t as ubiquitous as they are now, we showed and explained coding tricks and workarounds in blog posts. Now we find a solution, wrap it in a package or a library and release it for people to use. This is a natural progression in any software, but I miss the re-use and mulling around of the original thought. And I am also pretty sure that the usage numbers and stars on GitHub are pretty inflated.

My new (old) work modus

Instead of speaking at a high amount of conferences, I will be much pickier with where I go. My time is more limited now, and I want to use my talents to have a more direct impact. This is due to a few reasons:

  • I want to be able to measure more directly what I do – it is a good feeling to be told that you were inspiring and great. But it fails to stay a good feeling when you don’t directly see something coming out of it. That’s why instead of going from event to event I will spend more time developing tools and working directly with people who build products.
  • I joined a new team that is much more data driven – our job is to ensure people can build great apps and help them by fixing our platform and help them apply best practices instead of just hearing about them. This is exciting – I will be able to see just how applicable what we talk about really is and collect data of its impact. Just like any good trainer should ensure that the course attendees really learned what you talked about this is a full feedback loop for cool technologies like ServiceWorker and Push Nofifications.
  • We just hired a truckload of talented people to coach – and I do want to see other people on stage than the usual suspects. It is great to see people grow with help you can give.
  • I just had a cancer growth removed from my face – it was benign but it is kind of a wake-up call to take more care about myself and have my body looked after better on an ongoing basis
  • I am moving to Berlin to exclusively live there with my partner and our dog – I’ve lived out of suitcases for years now and while this is great it is fun to have a proper home with people you care about to look after. I will very much miss London, but I am done with the politics there and I don’t want to maintain two places any longer.
  • I will spend more time coding – I am taking over some of the work on PWAbuilder and other helper tools and try them out directly with partners. Working in the open is great, but there is a huge difference between what Twitter wants and what people really need
  • I will write more – both articles and blog posts. I will also have a massive stab at refreshing the Developer Evangelism Handbook
  • I will work more with my employer and its partners – there is a huge group of gifted, but very busy developers out there that would love to use more state-of-the-art technology but have no time to try it out or to go to conferences.

Anke, Larry and ChrisGreetings from Berlin

What this means for events and meetups

Simple.

  • I will attend less – instead I will connect conferences and meetups with other people who are not as in demand but great at what they do. I am also helping and mentoring people inside and outside the company to be invited instead of me. A lot of times a recommendation is all that is needed. And a helping hand in getting over the fear of “not being good enough”.
  • I will stay shorter – I want to still give keynotes and will consider more workshops. But I won’t be booking conferences back-to-back and will not take part in a lot of the social activities. Unless my partner is also coming along. Even better when the dog is allowed, too.
  • I am offering to help others – to review their work to get picked and help conference organisers to pick new, more diverse, talent.

I have a lot of friends who do events and I will keep supporting those I know have their full heart in them. I will also try to be supportive for others that need a boost for their new event. But I think it is a good time to help others step up. As my colleague Charles Morris just said at DevRelConf, “not all conferences need a Chris Heilmann”. It is easy to get overly excited about the demand you create. But it is as important to not let it take over your life.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Christian Heilmann: DevRelSummit was well worth it

Mozilla planet - wo, 16/08/2017 - 11:47

Last week I was in Seattle to attend a few meetings and I was lucky to attend DevRelSummit in the Galvanize space. I was invited to cover an “Ask me anything” slot about Developer Outreach in Microsoft and help out Charles Morris of the Edge team who gave a presentation a similar matter.

Q & A session with @Microsoft's @codepo8 about #devrel. #DevRelSummit #tech #microsoft pic.twitter.com/PFaW8Wi4Fl

— Angel Banks (@angelmbanks) August 11, 2017

It feels weird to have a conference that is pretty meta about the subject of Developer relations (and there is even a ConfConf for conference organisers), but I can wholeheartedly recommend DevRelSummit for people who already work in this field and those who want to.

The line-up and presentations were full of people who know their job and shared real information from the trenches instead of advertising products to help you. This is a very common worry when a new field in our job market gains traction. Anyone who runs events or outreach programs drowns in daily offers of “the turn-key solution to devrel success” or similar snake oil.

In short, the presentations were:

  • Bear Douglas of Slack (formerly Twitter and Facebook) sharing wins and fails of developer outreach
  • Charles Morris of Microsoft showing how he scaled from 3 people on the Edge team to a whole group, aligning engineering and outreach
  • Kyle Paul showing how to grow a community in spaces that are not technical cool spots and how to measure DevFest success
  • AJ Glasser of Unity explaining how to deal with and harvest feedback you get showing some traps to avoid
  • Damon Hernandez of Samsung talking about building community around hackathons
  • Linda Xie of Sourcegraph showing the product and growth cycle of a new software product
  • Robert Nyman of Google showing how he got into DevRel and what can be done to stay safe and sound on the road
  • Angel Banks and Beth Laing sharing the road to and the way to deliver an inclusive conference with their “We Rise” event as the example
  • Jessica Tremblay and Sam Richard showing how IBM scaled their developer community

In between the presentations there were breakout discussions, lightning talks and general space and time to network and share information.

As expected, the huge topics of the event were increasing diversity, running events smoothly, scaling developer outreach and measuring devrel success. Also, as expected, there were dozens of ways and ideas how to do these things with consensus and agreeable discourse.

All in all, DevRelSummit was a very well executed event and a superb networking opportunity without any commercial overhead. There was a significant lack of grandstanding and it was exciting to have a clear and open information exchange amongst people who should be in competition but know that when it comes to building communities, this is not helpful. There is a finite amount of people we want to reach doing Developer Relations. There is no point in trying to subdivide this group even further.

Cheers to another successful @DevRelSummit, Sandra & Barry! ?@SandraPersing @bteiger pic.twitter.com/aPVfpvRe9w

— Tia Over (@tiaover) August 12, 2017

I want to thank everyone involved about the flawless execution and the willingness to share. Having a invite-only slack group with pre-set channels for each talk and session was incredibly helpful and means the conversations are going on right now.

Slack Channel of the event

DevRelSummit showed that when you get a dedicated group of people together who know their jobs and are willing to share that you can get an event to be highly educational without any of the drama that plights other events. We have a lot of problems to solve and many of them are very human issues. A common consensus of the event was that we have to deal with humans and relate to them. Numbers and products are good and useful, but not burning out or burning bridges even with the best of intentions are even more important.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Intern Presentations: Round 4: Tuesday, August 15th

Mozilla planet - ti, 15/08/2017 - 22:00

 Tuesday, August 15th Intern Presentations 6 presenters Time: 1:00PM - 2:30PM (PDT) - each presenter will start every 15 minutes 5 MTV, 1 Berlin

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Intern Presentations: Round 4: Tuesday, August 15th

Mozilla planet - ti, 15/08/2017 - 22:00

 Tuesday, August 15th Intern Presentations 6 presenters Time: 1:00PM - 2:30PM (PDT) - each presenter will start every 15 minutes 5 MTV, 1 Berlin

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Essential WebVR resources

Mozilla planet - ti, 15/08/2017 - 15:30

The general release of Firefox 55 brought a number of cool new features to the Gecko platform, one of which is the WebVR API v1.1. This allows developers to create immersive VR experiences inside web apps, compatible with popular hardware such as HTC VIVE, Oculus Rift, and Google Daydream. This article looks at the resources we’ve made available to facilitate getting into WebVR development.

Support notes

Version 1.1 of the WebVR API is very new, with varying support available across modern browsers:

  • Firefox 55 sees full support on Windows, and more experimental support available for Mac in the Beta/Nightly release channels only, until testing and final work is completed. Supported VR hardware includes HTC VIVE, Oculus Rift, and Google Daydream.
  • Chrome support is still experimental — you can currently only see support out in the wild on Chrome for Android with Google Daydream.
  • Edge fully supports WebVR 1.1, through the Windows Mixed Reality headset.
  • Support is also available in Samsung Internet, via their GearVR hardware.

Note that the 1.0 version of the API can be considered obsolete, and has been (or will be) removed from all major browsers.

Controlling WebVR apps using the full features of VR controllers relies on the Gamepad Extensions API. This adds features to the Gamepad API that provide access to controller features like haptic actuators (e.g. vibration hardware) and position/orientation data (i.e., pose). This currently has even more limited support than the WebVR API; Firefox 55+ has it available in Beta/Nightly channels.

In other browsers, you’ll have to make do for now with basic Gamepad API functionality, like reporting button presses.

vr.mozilla.org

vr.mozilla.org — Mozilla’s new landing pad for WebVR — features demos, utilities, news and updates, and all the other information you’ll need to get up and running with WebVR.

MDN documentation

MDN has full documentation available for both the APIs mentioned above. See:

In addition, we’ve written some useful guides to get you familiar with the basics of using these APIs:

A-Frame and other libraries

WebVR experiences can be fairly complex to develop. The API itself is easy to use, but you need to use WebGL to create the 3D scenes you want to feature in your apps, and this can prove difficult to those not well-versed in low-level graphics programming. However, there are a number of libraries to hand that can help with this.

The hero of the WebVR world is Mozilla’s A-Frame library, which allows you to create nice looking 3D scenes using custom HTML elements, handling all the WebGL for you behind the scenes. A-Frame apps are also WebVR-compatible by default. It is perfect for putting together apps and experiences quickly.

There are a number of other well-written 3D libraries available too, which abstract away the difficulty of working with raw WebGL. Good examples include:

These don’t include VR capabilities out of the box, but it is not too difficult to write your own WebVR rendering code around them.

If you are worried about supporting older browsers that only include WebVR 1.0 (or no VR) as well as newer browsers with 1.1, you’ll be pleased to know that there is a WebVR polyfill available.

Demos and examples See also
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Reps Community: Reps Program Objectives – Q3 2017

Mozilla planet - ti, 15/08/2017 - 10:16

As with every quarter, we define Objectives and Key Results for the Reps Program. We are happy to announce the Objectives for the current quarter.

Objective 1: The Reps program continues to grow its process maturity
KR1: 20 Reps have been trained with the Resource training
KR2: 100% of the budget requests of new Reps are filed by Resource Track Reps
KR3: 30 Reps complete the coaching training
KR4: The amount of mentor-less Reps is reduced by 50%
KR5: Increase number of authors for Reps tweets to 10 people

Objective 2: The Reps program is the backbone for any mobilizing needs
KR1: We documented what mobilizing Reps are focusing on
KR2: An implementation roadmap for mobilizers’ recommendations is in place.
KR3: Identified 1 key measures that is defining how our Mobilizers add value to the coding and Non-Coding/Enthusiast communities

Objective 3: The Activate Portal is improved for Mobilizer Reps and Functional Areas
KR1: The Rust activity is updated
KR2: The WebExtensions activity update has been tested in 3 pilot events in 3 different countries
KR3: 60 unique Reps have run a MozActivate event
KR4: The website is updated to the new branding

We will work closely with the Community Development Team to achieve our goals. You can follow the progress of these tasks in the Reps Issue Tracker. We also have a dashboard to track the status of each objective.

Which of the above objectives are you most interested in? What key result would you like to hear more about? What do you find intriguing? Which thoughts cross your mind upon reading this? Where would you like to help out? Let’s keep the conversation going! Join the discussion on Discourse.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Nick Cameron: These Weeks in Dev-tools #1

Mozilla planet - ti, 15/08/2017 - 07:37

2017-08-14

Welcome to the first ever issue of 'These Weeks in Dev-Tools'! The dev-tools team is responsible for developer tools for Rust developers. That means any tools a developer might use (or want to use) when reading, writing, or debugging Rust code, such as Rustdoc, IDEs, editors, Racer, bindgen, Clippy, Rustfmt, etc.

These Weeks in Dev-Tools will keep you up to date with all the exciting news in this area. We plan to have a new issue every few weeks. If you have any news you'd like us to report, please comment on the tracking issue.

If you're interested in Rust's developer tools and want to contribute or ask questions, come chat to us in #rust-dev-tools.

Releases RFCs Thanks!
  • @photoszzt has been re-writing various ad-hoc computations into fix-point analyses in Bindgen:
    • whether we can add derive(Debug) to a struct: rust-lang-nursery/rust-bindgen#824
    • and whether a struct has a virtual table: rust-lang-nursery/rust-bindgen#850
  • @topecongiro for doing sustained, impressive work on Rustfmt - implementing the new RFC style, fixing (literally) hundreds of bugs, and lots more.
  • Shout out to @TedDriggs for continuing to push Racer forward. Jwilm and the rest of Racer's users continue to appreciate all your hard work!
Meetings

We've had a bunch of meetings. You can find all the minutes here. Some that might be interesting:

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Bringing the 4th Amendment into the Digital Age

Mozilla planet - ti, 15/08/2017 - 06:31

Today, Mozilla has joined other major technology companies in filing an amicus brief urging the Supreme Court of the United States to reexamine how the 4th Amendment and search warrant requirements should apply in our digital era. We are joining this brief because we believe our laws need to keep up with what we already know to be true: that the Internet is an integral part of modern life, and that user privacy must not be treated as optional.

At the heart of this case is the government’s attempt to obtain “cell site location information” to aid in a criminal investigation. This information is generated continuously when your phone is on. Your phone communicates with nearby cell sites to connect with the cellular network and those sites create a record of your phone’s location as you go about your business. In the case at hand, the government did not obtain a warrant, which would have required probable cause, before obtaining this location information. Instead, the government sought a court order under the Stored Communications Act of 1986, which requires a lesser showing.

Looking at how the courts have dealt with the cell phone location records in this case demonstrates why our laws must be revisited to account for modern technological reality. The district court decided that the government didn’t have to obtain a warrant because people do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy in their cell phone location information. On appeal, the Sixth Circuit acknowledged that similar information, such as GPS monitoring in government investigations, would require a warrant. But it too found no warrant was needed because the location information was a “business record” from a “third party” (i.e., the service providers).

We believe users should not be forced to surrender their expectations of privacy when using their phones and we hope the Court will reconsider the law in this area.

*Brief link updated on August 16

The post Bringing the 4th Amendment into the Digital Age appeared first on Open Policy & Advocacy.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 195

Mozilla planet - ti, 15/08/2017 - 06:00

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

This Week in Rust is openly developed on GitHub. If you find any errors in this week's issue, please submit a PR.

Updates from Rust Community News & Blog Posts Crate of the Week

This week's crate is exa, a modern ls replacement (with a tree thrown in as well) written in Rust. Thanks to Vikrant for the suggestion.

Submit your suggestions and votes for next week!

Call for Participation

Always wanted to contribute to open-source projects but didn't know where to start? Every week we highlight some tasks from the Rust community for you to pick and get started!

Some of these tasks may also have mentors available, visit the task page for more information.

If you are a Rust project owner and are looking for contributors, please submit tasks here.

Updates from Rust Core

128 pull requests were merged in the last week

New Contributors
  • Alexey Tarasov
  • arshiamufti
  • Foucher
  • Justin Browne
  • Natalie Boehm
  • nicole mazzuca
  • Owen Sanchez
  • Ryan Leckey
  • Tej Chajed
  • Thomas Levy
Approved RFCs

Changes to Rust follow the Rust RFC (request for comments) process. These are the RFCs that were approved for implementation this week:

No RFCs were approved this week.

Final Comment Period

Every week the team announces the 'final comment period' for RFCs and key PRs which are reaching a decision. Express your opinions now. This week's FCPs are:

New RFCs Style RFCs

Style RFCs are part of the process for deciding on style guidelines for the Rust community and defaults for Rustfmt. The process is similar to the RFC process, but we try to reach rough consensus on issues (including a final comment period) before progressing to PRs. Just like the RFC process, all users are welcome to comment and submit RFCs. If you want to help decide what Rust code should look like, come get involved!

The RFC style is now the default style in Rustfmt - try it out and let us know what you think!

Currently being discussed:

Upcoming Events

If you are running a Rust event please add it to the calendar to get it mentioned here. Email the Rust Community Team for access.

Rust Jobs

No jobs listed for this week.

Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust to get your job offers listed here!

Quote of the Week

once you can walk barefoot (C), it’s easy to learn to walk with shoes (go) but it will take time to learn to ride a bike (rust)

/u/freakhill on Reddit.

Thanks to Rushmore for the suggestion.

Submit your quotes for next week!

This Week in Rust is edited by: nasa42, llogiq, and brson.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Marketing Engineering & Ops Blog: MozMEAO SRE Status Report - August 15, 2017

Mozilla planet - ti, 15/08/2017 - 02:00

Here’s what happened on the MozMEAO SRE team from August 8th - August 15th.

Current work MDN Migration to AWS
  • We’ve setup a few cronjobs to periodically sync static files from the current SCL3 datacenter to an S3 bucket. Our Kubernetes development environment runs a cronjobs that pulls these files from S3 to a local EFS mount.
    • There was some additional work needed to deal with files in SCL3 that contained unicode characters in their names.
  • A cronjob in Kubernetes has been implemented to backup new files uploaded to our shared EFS volume.

  • We’ve finished our evaluation of hosted Elasticsearch from elastic.co, which we’ll be using for our initial migration in production.
Upcoming Portland Deis 1 cluster decommissioning

The Deis 1 cluster in Portland is tentatively scheduled to be decommissioned later this week.

Links
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Addons Blog: Add-ons Update – 2017/08

Mozilla planet - ti, 15/08/2017 - 01:23

Here’s the monthly update of the state of the add-ons world.

The Review Queues

In the past month, our team reviewed 1,803 listed add-on submissions:

  • 1368 in fewer than 5 days (76%).
  • 147 between 5 and 10 days (8%).
  • 288 after more than 10 days (16%).

274 listed add-ons are awaiting review.

If you’re an add-on developer and are looking for contribution opportunities, please consider joining us. Visit our wiki page for more information.

Compatibility Update

We published the blog post for 56 and the bulk validation has been run. This is the last one of these we’ll do, since compatibility is a much smaller problem with the WebExtensions API.

Firefox 57 is now on the Nightly channel, and only accepting WebExtension add-ons by default. Here are some changes we’re implementing on AMO to ease the transition to 57.

We recommend that you test your add-ons on Beta. If you’re an add-ons user, you can install the Add-on Compatibility Reporter. It helps you identify and report any add-ons that aren’t working anymore.

Recognition

We would like to thank the following people for their recent contributions to the add-ons world:

  • Apoorva Pandey
  • Neha Tekriwal
  • Swapnesh Kumar Sahoo
  • rctgamer3
  • Tushar Saini
  • vishal-chitnis
  • Cameron Kaiser
  • zombie
  • Trishul Goel
  • Krzysztof Modras
  • Tushar Saini
  • Tim Nguyen
  • Richard Marti
  • Christophe Villeneuve
  • Jan Henning
  • Leni Mutungi
  • dw-dev
  • Dino Herbert

You can read more about their work in our recognition page.

The post Add-ons Update – 2017/08 appeared first on Mozilla Add-ons Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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