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Updated: 2 moannen 1 wike ferlyn

Robert Kaiser: Lantea Maps Updates to Track Saving and Drawing

mo, 22/01/2018 - 00:52
After my last post on Lantea Maps (my web app to record GPS tracks), I started working on some improvements to its code.

First, I created a new backend for storing GPS tracks on my servers and integrated it into the web app. You need to log in via my own OAuth2 server, and then you can upload tracks fairly seamlessly and nicely.
The UI for uploading is now also fully integrated into the track "drawer" which should make uploading tracks a smoother experience than previously. And as a helpful feature for people who use Lantea Maps on multiple devices, a device name can be configured via the settings "drawer".

Image No. 23315 Image No. 23316

The saved tracks are listed in the new library view (also accessible for the track "drawer" when logged in) and linked to a GPX file to download download - that way the recorded and uploaded tracks can be accessed from a different device and downloaded to there. The library UI has a lot of potential for improvement but this first version has been working decently for me for a while now in testing.

In addition, the first piece of new PWA (Progressive Web Apps) technology has been integrated: Due to the W3C Manifest, you can now add Lantea Maps to your home screen from browsers like Firefox for Android.

Image No. 23318 Image No. 23317

Even more, I optimized the code drawing the GPS tracks so that off-screen segments aren't drawn, even though I'm unsure how to measure drawing and panning speed, so I can't put actual numbers behind what that work may have helped or not - but I hope it improved performance when large tracks are loaded.

To round up all the work, I added a welcome and an update information screen to be able to tell people both how to initially use the app and what changed on updates.

This is a spare time project so I'm doing updates very irregularly but I'm using the app myself almost daily so it should continue to be maintained in the future as time and motivation allow. :)
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mark Banner: New Thunderbird Conversations released (with support for 52)!

fr, 01/09/2017 - 08:35

We’ve just released a new Thunderbird Conversations (previously know as Gmail Conversation View) with full support for Thunderbird 52. We’re sorry for the delay, but the good news is it should now work fine.

I’d like to thank Jonathan for letting me help out with the release process, and for all those who contributed to release or filed issues.

If you find an issue, please submit it at our support site.

The add-on should work with the current Thunderbird Beta versions (56), but won’t currently work in Daily (57) due to some compatibility issues. We’re hoping to get those resolved in the next week or so.

If you want to help out with future releases, then find the source code here and come and help us with supporting users or fixing issues.

The post New Thunderbird Conversations released (with support for 52)! appeared first on Standard8's Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Joshua Cranmer: A review of the solar eclipse

ti, 22/08/2017 - 06:59
On Monday, I, along with several million other people, decided to view the Great American Eclipse. Since I presently live in Urbana, IL, that meant getting in my car and driving down I-57 towards Carbondale. This route is also what people from Chicago or Milwaukee would have taken, which means traffic was heavy. I ended up leaving around 5:45 AM, which puts me around the last clutch of people leaving.

Our original destination was Goreville, IL (specifically, Ferne Clyffe State Park), but some people who arrived earlier got dissatisfied with the predicted cloudy forecast, so we moved the destination out to Cerulean, KY, which meant I ended up arriving around 11:00 AM, not much time before the partial eclipse started.

Partial eclipses are neat, but they're very much a see-them-once affair. When the moon first entered the sun, you get a flurry of activity as everyone puts on the glasses, sees it, and then retreats back into the shade (it was 90°F, not at all comfortable in the sun). Then the temperature starts to drop—is that the eclipse, or this breeze that started up? As more and more gets covered, then it starts to dim: I had the impression that a cloud had just passed in front of the sun, and I wanted to turn and look at that non-existent cloud. And as the sun really gets covered, then trees start acting as pinhole cameras and the shadows take on a distinctive scalloped pattern.

A total eclipse though? Completely different. The immediate reaction of everyone in the group was to start planning to see the 2024 eclipse. For those of us who spent 10, 15, 20 hours trying to see 2-3 minutes of glory, the sentiment was not only that it was time well spent, but that it was worth doing again. If you missed the 2017 eclipse and are able to see the 2024 eclipse, I urge you to do so. Words and pictures simply do not do it justice.

What is the eclipse like? In the last seconds of partiality, everyone has their eyes, eclipse glasses on of course, staring at the sun. The thin crescent looks first like a side picture of an eyeball. As the time ticks by, the tendrils of orange slowly diminish until nothing can be seen—totality. Cries come out that it's safe to take the glasses off, but everyone is ripping them off anyways. Out come the camera phones, trying to capture that captivating image. That not-quite-perfect disk of black, floating in a sea of bright white wisps of the corona, not so much a circle as a stretched oval. For those who were quick enough, the Baily's beads can be seen. The photos, of course, are crap: the corona is still bright enough to blot out the dark disk of the moon.

Then, our attention is drawn away from the sun. It's cold. It's suddenly cold; the last moment of totality makes a huge difference. Probably something like 20°F off the normal high in that moment? Of course, it's dark. Not midnight, all-you-see-are-stars dark; it's more like a dusk dark. But unlike normal dusk, you can see the fringes of daylight in all directions. You can see some stars (or maybe that's just Venus; astronomy is not my strong suit), and of course a few planes are in the sky. One of them is just a moving, blinking light in the distance; another (chasing the eclipse?) is clearly visible with its contrail. And the silence. You don't notice the usual cacophony of sounds most of the time, but when everyone shushes for a moment, you hear the deafening silence of insects, of birds, of everything.

Naturally, we all point back to the total eclipse and stare at it for most of the short time. Everything else is just a distraction, after all. How long do we have? A minute. Still more time for staring. A running commentary on everything I've mentioned, all while that neck is craned skyward and away from the people you're talking to. When is it no longer safe to keep looking? Is it still safe—no orange in the eclipse glasses, should still be fine. How long do we need to look at the sun to damage our eyes? Have we done that already? Are the glasses themselves safe? As the moon moves off the sun, hold that stare until that last possible moment, catch the return of the Baily's beads. A bright spark of sun, the photosphere is made visible again, and then clamp the eyes shut as hard as possible while you fumble the glasses back on to confirm that orange is once again visible.

Finally, the rush out of town. There's a reason why everyone leaves after totality is over. Partial eclipses really aren't worth seeing twice, and we just saw one not five minutes ago. It's just the same thing in reverse. (And it's nice to get back in the car before the temperature gets warm again; my dark grey car was quite cool to the touch despite sitting in the sun for 2½ hours). Forget trying to beat the traffic; you've got a 5-hour drive ahead of you anyways, and the traffic is going to keep pouring onto the roads over the next several hours anyways (10 hours later, as I write this, the traffic is still bad on the eclipse exit routes). If you want to avoid it, you have to plan your route away from it instead.

I ended up using this route to get back, taking 5 hours 41 minutes and 51 seconds including a refueling stop and a bathroom break. So I don't know how bad I-57 was (I did hear there was a crash on I-57 pretty much just before I got on the road, but I didn't know that at the time), although I did see that I-69 was completely stopped when I crossed it. There were small slowdowns on the major Illinois state roads every time there was a stop sign that could have been mitigated by sitting police cars at those intersections and effectively temporarily signalizing them, but other than that, my trip home was free-flowing at speed limit the entire route.

Some things I've learned:

  • It's useful to have a GPS that doesn't require cellphone coverage to figure out your route.
  • It's useful to have paper maps to help plan a trip that's taking you well off the beaten path.
  • It's even more useful to have paper maps of the states you're in when doing that.
  • The Ohio River is much prettier near Cairo, IL than it is near Wheeling, WV.
  • The Tennessee River dam is also pretty.
  • Driving directions need to make the "I'm trying to avoid anything that smells like a freeway because it's going to be completely packed and impassable" mode easier to access.
  • Passing a car by crossing the broken yellow median will never not be scary.
  • Being passed by a car crossing the broken yellow median is still scary.
  • Driving on obscure Kentucky state roads while you're playing music is oddly peaceful and relaxing.
  • The best test for road hypnosis is seeing how you can drive a long, straight, flat, featureless road. You have not seen a long, straight, flat, featureless road until you've driven something like an obscure Illinois county road where the "long, straight" bit means "20 miles without even a hint of a curve" and the "featureless" means "you don't even see a house, shed, barn, or grain elevator to break up corn and soy fields." Interstates break up the straight bit a lot, and state highways tend to have lots of houses and small settlements on them that break up endless farm fields.
  • Police direction may not permit you to make your intended route work.
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert Kaiser: Celebrating LCARS With One Last Theme Release

snein, 20/08/2017 - 00:21
30 years ago, a lot of people were wondering what the new Star Trek: The Next Generation series would bring when it would debut in September 1987. The principal cast had been announced, as well as having a new Enterprise and even the pilot's title was known, but - as always with a new production - a lot of questions were open, just like today in 2017 with Star Trek Discovery, which is set to debut in September almost to the day on the 30th anniversary of The Next Generation.

Given that the story was set to play 100 years after the original and what was considered "futuristic" had significantly changed between the late 1960s and 1980s, the design language had to be significantly updated, including the labels and screens on the new Enterprise. Scenic art supervisor and technical consultant Michael Okuda, who had done starship computer displays for The Voyage Home, was hired to do those for the new series, and was instructed by series creator and show runner Gene Roddenberry that this futuristic ship should have "simple and clean" screens and not much animation (the latter probably also due to budget and technology constraints - the "screens" were built out of colored plexiglass with lights behind them).



With that, Okuda created a look that became known as "LCARS" (for Library Computer Access and Retrieval System (which actually was the computer system's name). Instead of the huge gray panels with big brightly-colored physical buttons in the original series, The Next Generation had touch-screen panels with dark background and flat-style buttons in pastel color tones. The flat design including the fonts and flat-design frames are very similar to quite a few designs we see on touch-friendly mobile apps 30 years later. Touch screens (and even cell phones and tablets) were pretty much unheard of and "future talk" when Mike Okuda created those designs, but he came to pretty similar design conclusions as those who design UIs for modern touch-screen devices (which is pretty awesome when you think of it).

I was always fascinated with that style of UI design even on non-touch displays (and am even more so now that I'm using touch screens daily), and so 18 years ago, when I did my first experiments with Mozilla's new browser-mail all-in-one package and realized that the UI was displayed with the same rendering engine and the same or very similar technologies as websites, I immediately did some CSS changes to see if I could apply LCARS-like styling to this software - and awesomeness ensued when I found out that it worked!

Image No. 23114

Over the years, I created a full LCARStrek theme from those experiments (first release, 0.1, was for Mozilla suite nightlies in late 2000), adapted it to Firefox (starting with LCRStrek 2.1 for Firefox 4), refined it and even made it work with large Firefox redesigns. But as you may have heard, huge changes are coming to Firefox add-ons, and full-blown themes in a manner of LCARStrek cannot be done in the new world as it stands right now, so I'm forced to stop developing this theme.

Image No. 23308

Given that LCARS has a huge anniversary this year, I want to end my work on this theme on a high instead of a too sad a note though, so right along the very awesome Star Trek Las Vegas convention, which just celebrated 30 years of The Next Generation, of course, I'm doing one last LCARStrek release this weekend, with special thanks to Mike Okuda, whose great designs made this theme possible in the first place (picture taken by myself at that convention just two weeks ago, where he was talking about the backlit LCARS panels that were dubbed "Okudagrams" by other crew members):
Image No. 23314

Live long and prosper!
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert Kaiser: Lantea Maps: GPS Track Upload to OpenStreetMap Broken

sn, 19/08/2017 - 16:49
During my holidays, when I was using Lantea Maps daily to record my GPS tracks, I suddenly found out one day that upload of the tracks to OpenStreetMap was broken.

I had added that functionality so that people (including myself) could get their GPS tracks out of their mobile devices and into a place from which they can download them anywhere. A bonus was that the tracks were available to the OpenStreetMap project as guides to improve the maps.

After I had wasted about EUR 50 of data roaming costs to verify that it was not only broken on hotel networks but also my mobile network that usually worked, I tried on a desktop Nightly and used the Firefox devtools to find out the actual error message, which was a CORS issue. I filed a GitHub issue but apparently it was an intentional change and OpenStreetMap doesn't support GPS track uploads any more in a way that is simple for pure web apps and also doesn't want to re-add support for that. Find more details in the GitHub issue.

Because of that, I think that this will mark the end of uploading tracks from Lantea Maps to OpenStreetMap. When I have time, I will probably add a GPS track store on my server instead, where third-party changes can't break stuff while I'm on vacation. If any Lantea Maps user wants their tracks on OpenStreetMap in the future, they'll need to manually upload the tracks themselves.
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Calendar: There is a lot to see — Convert XUL to HTML

to, 20/07/2017 - 11:18

This is a repost from medium, where Arshad originally wrote the blog post.

 

In the past blog, I talked mostly about the development environment setup, but this blog will be about the react dialog development.

Since then I have been working on converting some more dialogs into React. I have converted three dialogs — calendar properties dialog, calendar alarm dialog and print dialog into their React equivalent till now. Calendar alarm dialog and print dialog still need some work on state logic but it is not something that will take much time. Here are some screenshots of these dialogs.

calendar-properties-dialog

print-dialog

calendar-alarm-dialog

 

While making react equivalents, I found out XUL highly depends upon attributes and their values. HTML doesn’t work with attributes and their values in the same way XUL does. HTML allows attribute minimization and with React there are some other difficulties related to attributes. React automatically neglects all non-default HTML attributes so to add those attributes I have to add it explicitly using setAttribute method on the element when it has mounted. Here is a short snippet of code which shows how I am adding custom HTML attributes and updating them in React.

class CalendarAlarmWidget extends React.Component { componentDidMount() { this.addAttributes(this.props); } componentWillReceiveProps(nextProps) { // need to call removeAttributes first // so that previous render attributes are removed this.removeAttributes(); this.addAttributes(nextProps); } addAttributes(props) { // add attributes here } removeAttributes() { // remove attributes here } }

XUL also have dialog element which is used instead of window for dialog boxes. I have also made its react equivalent which has nearly all the attributes and functionality that XUL dialog element has. Since XUL has slightly different layout technique to position elements in comparison to HTML, I have dropped some of the layout specific attributes. With the power of modern CSS, it is quite easy to create the layout so instead of controlling layout using attributes I am depending more upon CSS to do these things. Some of the methods like centerWindowOnScreen and moveToAlertPosition are dependent on parent XUL wrapper so I have also dropped them for React equivalent.

There are some elements in XUL whose HTML equivalents are not available and for some XUL elements, HTML equivalents don’t have same structure so their appearance considerably differs. One perfect example would be menulist whose HTML equivalent is select. Unlike menulist whose direct child is menupopup which wraps all menuitem, select element directly wraps all the options so the UI of select can’t be made exactly similar to menulist. option elements are also not customizable unlike menuitem and it also doesn’t support much styling. While it is helpful to have React components that behave similar to their XUL counterparts, in the end only HTML will remain. Therefore it is unavoidable that some features not useful for the new components will be dropped.

I have made some custom React elements to provide all the features that existing dialogs provide, although I am still using HTML select element at some places instead of the custom menulist item because using javascript and extra CSS just to make the element look similar to XUL equivalent is not worth it.

As each platform has its own specific look, there are naturally differences in CSS rules. I have organized the files in a way that it is easy to write rules common to all platforms, but also add per-OS differences. A lot of the UI differences are handled automatically through -moz-appearance rules, which instruct the Mozilla Platform to use OS styling to render the elements. The web app will automatically detect your OS so you can see how the dialog will look on different platforms.

I thought it would be great to get quick suggestions and feedback on UI of dialogs from the community so I have added a comment section on each dialog page. I will be adding more cool features to the web app that can possibly help in making progress in this project.

Thanks to BrowserStack for providing free OSS plans, now I can quickly check how my dialogs are looking on Windows and Mac.

Thanks to yulia [IRC nickname] for finding time to discuss the react implementation of dialog, I hope to have more react discussions in future :)

Feel free to check the dialogs on web app and comment if you have any questions.


Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Calendar: First Steps  —  Convert XUL to HTML

ti, 13/06/2017 - 19:42

This is a repost from medium, where Arshad originally wrote the blog post.

 

This summer I am working on a Thunderbird project — Convert XUL to HTML, as a Google Summer of Code 2017 candidate. I am really excited and thrilled to start my journey at Mozilla. I will be working on Mozilla Calendar add-on for Thunderbird aka Lightning. The goal of this project will be to convert XUL dialog boxes into their React versions.

Project Abstract:

Lightning has traditionally been using XUL for its user interface. To modernize, we would like to convert dialogs, tab content and other parts of the user interface to HTML. The new components should use web standards as much as possible, avoiding extensive use of third party libraries.

The second week of the coding period is going to end and there is a lot to tell about the progress of the Convert XUL to HTML project. I was able to setup a balanced development environment and convert a dialog into React. Things are going well so far as the time invested in setting up the development environment is bringing results.

I will start by telling a bit about the challenges that I faced and later a bit about the solutions that I sorted out. Since Thunderbird doesn’t have any extra build step, it was very clear from the start that anything that needs an extra build/compile step is a NO for this project. By that, it means I have to compromise on the awesome features like hot-reloading, jsx etc. that are often paired with React. Another minor issue that I faced was styling of components of dialog box so that they can look exactly like their XUL versions.

At first, I thought of going with the option of importing react, react-dom via script tags and write code without jsx in vanilla js but later I thought why not automate this difficulty. I setup Babel with react-preset and wrote few lines of code to make a clean npm environment to do all these things. Since running Babel on the source directory only outputted the js files, I wrote a few gulp tasks to copy the HTML and CSS files to the compiled js directory.

It is kind of annoying to copy each file manually so I opted for going with Gulp. I also wrote a bash script that removes the Babel scripts and edits the type of main javascript files in the compiled directory’s HTML files. Now there is no extraneous code into the files of compiled directory(dist).

Using Gulp, I can live reload the browser automatically whenever I make any changes to the source files, this is not as good as hot-reloading but it’s better to have it rather than manually hitting the refresh button.

As a web developer, I never worried about the default styling of the browser but for this project, I have to be totally dependent on Firefox toolkit themes and Thunderbird CSS skins. It started to make sense after a few hours of work and now I can create exactly the same layout and appearance of elements in React as it has in XUL dialog boxes. All thanks go to developer tools of Thunderbird and DXR.

The dialog that I and my mentor Philipp decided to do first was calendar-properties-dialog as it was simple and it would help me to get a comfortable start. This dialog is now completely done except a few OS specific CSS rules which can be done later on after testing the dialog in Thunderbird. Working on this dialog was fun and easy and I hope this fun and easiness continues.

Anyone can check the progress of the project by either checking out this repository or logging on to https://gsoc17-convert-xul-to-html.herokuapp.com. I have also created an iframe testing ground where a user can send and modify the state object of dialog and open the dialog in an iframe. This page uses the same HTML5 postMessage API for communication between iframe and parent as it will use in Thunderbird dialog boxes, similar to how it is already working for the event dialog in the past GSoC project. I am sure the testing ground will save a lot of time in debugging and it clearly shows how things are going on internally within dialog box. It is like a mini control dashboard for our dialog boxes.

We haven’t tested out the current react dialog box in Thunderbird yet but after integrating react version of dialog boxes into Thunderbird, we will most likely not be using all these tools to generate the code, but focusing on using the minimal tools available in the Mozilla build system. We would like to hear the suggestions of Mozilla devtools folks to see if they have plans on improving tooling support and possibly using jsx, as it is much easier to read than having that converted to javascript.

I am very excited for the next weeks and I hope things go well as it has been going on. Many thanks to my mentor Philipp for his continuous support and Mozilla community for answering my questions on IRC. Any pieces of advice, suggestion and perhaps encouraging words are always welcome :)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert Kaiser: Representing Mozilla at Linuxwochen Wien 2017

snein, 07/05/2017 - 23:08
Linuxwochen ("Linux weeks") is a yearly series of Free & Open Source Software events/conferences in Austrian cities, organized by the respective local FLOSS communities but marketed via a common name and website. They commonly take place spread out over several weekends in April and May, with the largest one, Linuxwochen Wien, in Austria's capital of Vienna, on a Thursday through Saturday in early May. In this year's edition, from May 4-6, the Mozilla community was present there once again (like two years ago) with a booth, talks and a workshop.

Image No. 23309
While in 2015, the main topic at the Mozilla booth and workshop was Firefox OS, having a large 4K TV from Panasonic to show off and get people involved, things have changed a lot after sitting out a year (which happened due to me moving to a new condo at that time and as the sole Rep in the area being the one who needs to organize events like this presence).
This year, I was focusing on A-Frame (and therefore WebVR), both with the booth and the workshop. In addition, we could provide a talk by Dragana from Mozilla's network platform team about HTTP/2 and QUIC and I reprised my FOSDEM talk on web logins, this time in German. While the whole conference probably has a few hundred to a thousand visitors (hard to estimate when entrance is free and there are several parallel tracks), I probably got to talk to between several dozen and a hundred people at the booth, my workshop and talk both had 10-15 attendees, and Dragana's talk about 20-30. The conference overall has a bit of a family feel to it, attracting a decent amount of people but it's definitely not really large either. A lot of the attendees are pretty technical and already in the FLOSS scene in one way or another, but as it's happening on a technical college, we also get some of their students who may not be involved with that larger community - and then there are some casual visitors but they're probably rare.

Image No. 23310


At our booth, next to the takeaway collection of Firefox stickers and tatoos as well as Mozilla wristbands, I put up some printouts of the new logo and related artwork as decoration, and on the glass wall behind the booth, a big poster with a German variant of "doing good is part of our code" and the Firefox log as well as printouts of website screenshots depicting the variety of what's going on at Mozilla nowadays - from mozilla.org, Campus Clubs, Internet Health Report, and changecopyright.org via Rust, Servo, WebAssembly, CSS Grid, and A-Frame to Pocket and Let's Encrypt - of course all with big and visible URLs. On top of that, I had my laptop on the booth, running the Snowglobe example of A-Frame, as well as a few Cardboards and Z3C phones with the Museum example and a 360° image loaded and ready to show. On the laptop, I had the source code of the Hello WebVR on Glitch and a live view of that ready in additional tabs for explanations.

That setup ended up working very well - the always-moving snowglobe and the cardboards proved to be good eye-catchers and starting points for talking to people coming by. I had them look at the museum with the cardboard (nice because it's quite detailed and you can even "walk" around by staring at the yellow dots on the floor that you get on mobile) and told people how that was all running in the browser, and how Mozilla pioneered WebVR, which now is an open standard, and did the A-Frame library, that those demos are written in, and which makes it really easy to write VR scenes yourself, which led to showing them the Hello WebVR scene and its source code - often changing a color to show that it's really that easy. I later also added an <a-text> saying "Linuxwochen Wien" to that scene, when someone asked about text. A lot of "wow"s were heard, and many people noted down the aframe.io URL (which I should have had better visible somewhere) and/or had more questions, e.g. on using objects from 3D modeling software (you can, there are components for Collada, GLTF, and other formats), use cases outside of demos and games, device support (which I often had mentioned when talking about WebVR itself) and prices, which phones work with cardboard, how to get cardboards (I could have sold a few there), and more. All in all, WebVR and A-Frame peeked a real lot of interest.

Image No. 23311
Of course, questions outside of WebVR came up: "Mozilla has been killing so many things lately, what is the project actually working on now?" (leading to talk about a lot of the websites I had stuck on the wall, as well as the whole Quantum efforts to make Firefox better, as well as of course WebVR), questions on that status and future of Thunderbird (I'm on its planning mailing list so could answer most questions there), some Rust-related ones including "can I trust that Rust will be around in a few years when Mozilla tends to kill its own projects all the time?" (I hope I could calm the worries there), the usual Firefox support questions and some one-off specialty items - as well as multiple discussions on the demise of Firefox OS and how that increased the shortage of alternatives next to the proprietary iOS and Android choices on mobile. I was surprised at how there was nobody hugely disturbed by us killing plugins or the upcoming huge changes in the add-ons ecosystem, there was more concern about how many old computers we leave in the cold by unsupporting Windows XP and pre-SSE2 CPUs - and about how we seem to have more graphics-related crashes than Chrome.
One conversation with an IoT hacker once again showed me how much potential FlyWeb could have if it was pushed forward somewhat more.

The conversations definitely showed that there is interest in both more A-Frame/WebVR workshops and also potentially in Rust meetups in Vienna, so I will probably look into that.

This leads me to the A-Frame workshop I did on Friday, which went really well - starting with the introductory Presentation Kit, handing around the cardboards with the museum and 360° image as demos, an introduction round (which I forgot at the beginning, but fit well there as well), and then going hands-on on the attendees laptops. For that, I put up some steps from the A-Frame School - though I pointed people to awesome-aframe and where they can find the school, so they can also do some things at their own pace. I encouraged people to play around with the Hello WebVR example (and most didn't want to use Glitch but instead used local files and their editor of choice) and went around in the room, engaging with the attendees individually as they tried and also struggled with and solved different things. Adding image textures and tag-based animations were the big hit, unlike in my first workshop, there was very little JS used this time. One person had a big stone ball rolling towards the viewer in a narrow street, which can get scary... ;-)
The resounding feedback was that everyone (and we had a nicely diverse group, including an older man, multiple women, from web developers to an artist, people with our without previous experience with 3D or VR stuff) could take something with them and most of them were interested to join future workshops on the topic.

Image No. 23313
Our talks also did get good feedback from the people we talked to and pretty interesting and interested questions (I tend to take the kind and amount of questions I get at talks as a major piece of feedback). I think that all in all, we could spread the word on a number of Open Web and Mozilla topics and get people interested in things we are doing in this community. I also hope that this will result in growing our community somewhat in the mid to long term, as this time I had to man the booth alone most of the time. Thanks to Dragana and Arpad from the existing community though, who each joined the booth for a few hours on different days (and Dragana of course also for her talk).

For me, this was a pretty successful event, I hope we can do even better in the future - and if you are doing similar events, maybe my experiences can help you as well (feel free to ask me for more details)!
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert Kaiser: Final Round for My LCARStrek and EarlyBlue Themes

ti, 14/03/2017 - 18:33
As you may have noted, Mozilla published a plan for a new themes system that doesn't fully cover my thoughts on the matter and ends up making themes that go as far as my LCARStrek theme impossible.

The only way I could still hold up this extent of theming is to spread it guerilla-style as userChrome.css mods, i.e. a long CSS sheet to be copied into people's userChromes.css manually. That would still allow the extent of theming, but be extremely inconvenient to distribute.

Because of that, I will stop development of my themes as soon as Firefox 57 hits Nightly and I can't use the LCARStrek theme myself any more (EarlyBlue, which is SeaMonkey-only, is something I just dragged along anyhow). Given the insecurity of even having releases and the small "market", I also will not continue them for SeaMonkey only, Firefox has been the only thing that really mattered any more there.

Also, explicit theming support for Firefox devtools is being removed from LCARStrek with the 2.49 release that I just submitted to AMO as it's extremely complicated to maintain and with the looming removal of full themes from Firefox, that amount of work is not worth my time any more. Because of this, there is a bit of a mixture of styles in some areas of devtools esp. in Firefox 52 (improving in newer versions) but that is outside of the control of a theme author. I tested that devtools are usable this way, contrast of icons in toolbars isn't optimal at times but visible enough so developers can work with them. To any LCARStrek users, sorry for the inconvenience, I would have put more work into this if the theming feature of this extent would not be removed.

Image No. 23308

This is a hard step for me as the first thing I experimented with when I downloaded my first Mozilla M5 build in 1999 was actually the theming files, and LCARStrek came out of that as a demonstration of how awesome this system of customization was and how far it could go. It achieve a look that really was out of this world, but I guess the new direction of Firefox is not compatible with a 24th century look. ;-)

It will also be hard for me go move back to the bland look of the default theme, esp. as it looks even more boring on Linux than on other platforms, but I have a few months to get used to the idea before I actually have to do this, and I will keep the themes going for that little while.

Somehow this fits well with the overall theme that MoCo and myself are at odds right now on a number of things, but you can be assured that I'm not gone from the community, as a matter of fact I have planned a few activities in Vienna in the next months, from WebVR workshops to conference appearances, and I'm just about to finish the Tech Speakers training and hope to be more active in that area in the future.

LLAP!
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Calendar: GSoC 2016: Some Thoughts on React

ti, 13/09/2016 - 05:17

As discussed in the previous post, the HTML-based UI for editing events and tasks in a tab is still a work in progress that is in a fairly early stage and not something you could use yet.  (However, for any curious folks living on the bleeding edge who might still want to check it out, the previous post also describes how to activate it.)  This post relates to its implementation, namely the use of React, “a Javascript library for building user interfaces.”

For the HTML UI we decided to use React (but not JSX which is often paired with it).  React basically provides a nice declarative way to define composable, reusable UI components (like a tab strip, a text box, or a drop down menu) that you use to create a UI.  These are some of its main advantages over “raw” HTML.  It’s also quite efficient / fast and is a library that does one thing well and can be combined with other technologies (as compared with more monolithic frameworks).  I enjoyed using and learning about React.  Once you understand its basic model of state management and how the components work it is not very difficult or complicated to use.  I found its documentation to be quite good, and I liked how it lets you do everything in Javascript, since it generates the HTML for the UI dynamically.

One of the biggest differences when using React is that instead of storing state in DOM elements and querying them for their state (as we currently do), the app state is centralized in a top-level React component and from there it gets automatically distributed to various child components.  When the state changes (on user input) React automatically updates the UI to reflect those changes.  To do this it uses an internal “virtual DOM” which is basically a representation of the state of the DOM in Javascript.  When there are changes it compares the previous version of that virtual DOM with the new version to decide what changes need to be made to the actual DOM.  (Because the actual DOM is quite slow compared to Javascript, this approach gives React an advantage in terms of performance.)  Centralizing the app state in this way simplifies things considerably.  Direct interaction with DOM elements is not needed, and is actually an anti-pattern.

One example of the power and flexibility that React offers is that I actually did the “responsive design” part of the HTML UI with React rather than CSS.  The reason was that some of the UI components had to move to different positions in the UI when transitioning between the narrow and wide layouts for different window sizes.  This was not really possible with CSS, at least not without overly complex workarounds.  However, it was simple to do it with React because React can easily re-render the UI in any configuration you define, in this case in response to resizing the window past a certain threshold.  (Once CSS grid layout is available this kind of repositioning will be straightforward to do with CSS.)

React’s different approach to state does present some challenges for using it with existing code.  For this project at least it is not simply a matter of dropping it in and having it work, rather using it will entail some non-trivial code refactoring.  Basically, the code will need to be separated out into different jobs.  First there’s (1) interacting with the outside of the iframe (e.g. toolbar, menubar, statusbar) and (2) modifying and/or formatting the event or task data.  These are needed for both the XUL and HTML UIs.  Next there’s (3) updating and interacting with the XUL UI inside the iframe.  Currently these things (1, 2, and 3) are usually closely intertwined, for example in a single function.  Then there is (4) using React to define components and how they respond to changes to the app state, and (5) updating and interacting with the HTML UI inside the iframe (i.e. read from or write to the app state in the top-level React component).  So there is some significant refactoring work to do, but after it is done the code should be more robust and maintainable.

Despite the refactoring work that may be involved, I think that React has a lot to offer for future UI work for Calendar or Thunderbird as an alternative to XUL.  Especially for code that involves managing a lot of state (like the current project) using React and its approach should reduce complexity and make the code more maintainable.  Also, because it mostly involves using Javascript this simplifies things for developers.  When CSS grid layout is available that will also strengthen the case for HTML UI work since it will offer greater control over the layout and appearance of the UI.

I’ll close with links to two blog posts and a video about React that I found helpful:

— Paul Morris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Calendar: GSoC 2016: Wrapping Up

ti, 30/08/2016 - 17:14

It’s hard to believe it is already late August and this year’s Google Summer of Code is all wrapped up.  The past couple of months have really flown by.  In the previous post I summarized the feedback we received on the new UI design and discussed the work I’ve been doing to port the current UI (for editing events and tasks) to a tab.  In this post I’ll describe how to try out this new feature in a development version of Thunderbird, and give an update on the HTML implementation of the new UI design. In my next post I’ll share some thoughts on using React for the HTML UI.

To try out editing events and tasks in a tab instead of in a dialog window you’ll need a development version of Thunderbird (aka: “Daily”).  Since it is a development version you will want to use a separate profile and/or make sure your data is backed up.  Once you have that all set up, you can turn on the “event in a tab” feature with a hidden preference.  To access hidden preferences, go to Preferences > Advanced > Config Editor, and then search for “calendar.item.editInTab” and toggle it to true by double-clicking on it.

Or if that’s too much trouble you can just wait until it arrives in the next stable release of Thunderbird/Lightning.  In the meantime, here’s what it looks like (click to enlarge):

xul-ui-in-tab

The screenshot above shows the current XUL-based UI ported to a tab.  I ended up not having much time to work on the new HTML-based UI (actually only a week or so) and did not get as far on it as I’d hoped — only as far as a basic and preliminary implementation, a starting point for further development rather than something that can be used today.  For example, it does not yet support saving changes and not all of the data is loaded into the UI for a given event or task.

Some aspects do already work, like the responsive design where the UI changes to adapt to the width of the window, taking more advantage of the greater space available in a tab.  Here are two screen shots that show the wide and narrow views (click to enlarge).

html-ui-in-tab

html-ui-in-window

Even though the HTML UI is not ready for use yet, we decided to go ahead and land it in the code base as a work-in-progress for further development.  So if you are curious to see where it stands, it can also be turned on with a hidden preference (“calendar.item.useNewItemUI”) in a current development version of Thunderbird, as described above.  Again, be sure to use a separate profile and/or make sure your data is backed up.

For more technical details about the project, including some high-level documentation I wrote for this part of the code, see the meta bug, especially my comment #2 which summarizes the state of things as of the end of the Summer of Code period.

It was a great summer working on this project.  I learned a lot and enjoyed contributing.  As my time permits, I hope to continue to contribute and finish the implementation of the new UI.  Many thanks to Google, Mozilla, and especially to my mentors Philipp Kewisch (Fallen) and MakeMyDay for their guidance and tireless willingness to answer my questions and review code.  Also thanks to Richard Marti (Paenglab) for his help and feedback on the UI design work.

I wish there was another month of the official coding period to get the HTML implementation further along, but alas, so far we’ve only been able to help people manage their time, not actually generate more of it.

— Paul Morris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Calendar: GSoC 2016: Where Things Stand

to, 25/08/2016 - 22:22

The clock has run out on Google Summer of Code 2016.  In this post I’ll summarize the feedback we received on the new UI design and the work I’ve been doing since my last post.

Feedback on the New UI Design

A number of people shared their feedback on the new UI design by posting comments on the previous blog post.  The response was generally positive.  Here’s a brief summary:

  • One commenter advocated for keeping the current date/time picker design, while another just wanted to be sure to keep quick and easy text entry.
  • A question about how attendees availability would be shown (same as it is currently).
  • A request to consider following Google Calendar’s reminders UI.
  • A question about preserving the vertical scroll position across different tabs (this should not be a problem).
  • A concern about how the design would scale for very large numbers (say hundreds) of attendees, categories, reminders, etc.  (See my reply.)

Thanks to everyone who took the time to share their thoughts.  It is helpful to hear different views and get user input.  If you have not weighed in yet, feel free to do so, as more feedback is always welcome.  See the previous blog post for more details.

Coding the Summer Away

A lot has happened over the last couple months.  The big news is that I finished porting the current UI from the window dialog to a tab.  Here’s a screenshot of this XUL-based implementation of the UI in a tab (click to enlarge):

xul-ui-in-tab

Getting this working in a really polished way took more time than I anticipated, largely because the code had to be refactored so that the majority of the UI lives inside an iframe.  This entailed using asynchronous message passing for communication between the iframe’s contents and its outer parent context (e.g. toolbars, menus, statusbar, etc.), whether that context is a tab or a dialog window.  While this is not a visible change, it was necessary to prepare the way for the new HTML-based design, where an HTML file will be loaded in the iframe instead of a XUL file.

Along with the iframe refactoring, there are also just a lot of details that go into providing an ideal user experience, all the little things we tend to take for granted when using software.  Here’s a list of some of these things that I worked on over the last months for the XUL implementation:

  • when switching tabs, update the toolbar and statusbar to reflect the current tab
  • persist open tabs across application restarts (which requires serializing the tab state)
  • ask the user about saving changes before closing a tab, before closing the application window, and before quitting the application
  • allow customizing toolbars with the new iframe setup
  • provide a default window dialog height and width with the new iframe setup
  • display icons for tabs and related CSS/style work
  • get the relevant ‘Events and Tasks’ menu items to work for a task in a tab
  • allow hiding and showing the toolbar from the view > toolbars menu
  • if the user has customized their toolbar for the window dialog, migrate those settings to the tab toolbar on upgrade
  • fix existing mozmill tests so they work with the new iframe setup
  • test for regressions in SeaMonkey

In the next two posts I’ll describe how to try out this new feature in a development version of Thunderbird, discuss the HTML implementation of the new UI design, and share some thoughts on using React for the HTML implementation.

— Paul Morris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Calendar: GSoC 2016: Seeking Feedback on UI Design

mo, 13/06/2016 - 22:17

As you can see on the Event in a Tab wiki page, I have created a number of mockups, labeled A through N, for the new UI for creating, viewing, and editing calendar events and tasks.  (This has given me a lot of practice using Inkscape!)  The final design will be implemented in the second phase of the project.  So far the revisions have been based on valuable feedback from Paenglab and MakeMyDay (thanks!), and we are now seeking broader feedback from users on the latest and greatest mockup “N” (click to view full size):

Event in a Tab

Event in a Tab, UI Design, Mockup “N”

Please take a look and send any feedback, comments, suggestions, questions, etc. to the calendar mailing list / newsgroup where we will be discussing the design, or you can leave a comment on this blog post, send a private email to mozilla@kewis.ch, or reach us via IRC (in Mozilla’s #calendar channel).

Here are some notes and details about the behavior of the proposed UI that are not apparent from a static image.

The mockup is intended as a relatively rough “wire frame” to show layout and it only approximates spacing, sizing, and aesthetic details. Unless otherwise noted, functionality is the same as in the current Lightning add-on.

A responsive design approach will be used to implement this UI in HTML. As the window expands horizontally, the elements will expand with it up to a breakpoint where the two-column “tab” layout goes into effect. Then the elements will continue to expand in both of the columns, up to a certain maximum limit at which they would expand no further. (Having this limit will keep things more focused on very wide monitors/windows.)

For vertical scrolling in a tab… Categories, Reminders, Attachments, Attendees, and Description can expand to take up as much vertical space as necessary to show all of their content. In most cases, where there are only a small number of these items, there will be enough room on the page to show them all without any scrolling. In less common cases where there are many items, the content of the tab will grow taller until it no longer fits vertically, and then the whole tab will become scrollable. (The toolbar at the top, with the buttons like “Save and Close,” will not scroll, remaining in place, still easily accessible.) This approach makes it possible to view all of the items at once when there are many of them (instead of having smaller boxes around each of these elements that are each independently scrollable).  This “whole tab scrolling” approach is how it works in Google Calendar.

For vertical scrolling in a dialog window…  When the contents of the tabbed box (Reminders, Attachments, Attendees, and Description) becomes too big to fit vertically, the tabbed box becomes scrollable.  (Suggestions are welcome for the name of the “More” tab in the window dialog.)

The mockup shows the new date/time picker that is being developed by Mozilla.  It remains to be seen whether it will be available in time for use in this project.  Another possibility is the date/time picker developed by Fastmail.

Progress Report on Coding

Besides working on the design for the UI, I have continued to work on porting the current event dialog UI to a tab.  I created a bug for this part of the first phase of the project, posted my first work-in-progress patch there, and am now working on the next iteration based on the feedback.

This work includes refactoring the current event dialog’s XUL file into more than one file to separate the main part of the UI from its menu bar, tool bar, and status bar items.  This more modular arrangement will make it possible to make the menu bar, tool bar, and status bar items appear in the correct places in the main Thunderbird window when displaying the UI in a tab.  This will solve the problem of the doubled status bar and menu bar in my first patch.

The next patch will also have a hidden preference (accessible via “about:config” but eventually to be added to Lightning’s preferences UI) that determines whether event and task dialogs are opened in a window or a tab by default.

So overall, things are progressing well, which is a good thing since there is only about a week or so left before the GSoC midterm milestone, and the goal is to have phase one of the project completed by that point.  After I have finished this initial “phase one” patch, and any follow-up work that needs to be done for it, we will reach a decision about whether to use XUL, Web Components, React.js, or “plain vanilla” HTML for the implementation of the new UI design, and then start working on implementing it.

— Paul Morris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Calendar: GSoC 2016: First Steps

to, 02/06/2016 - 21:26

Time for a progress report after my first week or so working on the Event in a Tab GSoC project. Things are going well so far. In short, I have the current event and task dialogs opening in a tab rather than a window and I can create and edit tasks and events in a tab. While not everything is working yet most things already are.

The trickiest part has been working with XUL, since I am not as familiar with it as I am with Javascript. With some help from Fallen on IRC I figured out how to register a new XUL document that contains an iframe and how to load another XUL file into this iframe. For an event or task that is editable one XUL file is loaded (calendar-event-dialog.xul), but if it is read-only then a different XUL file is loaded (calendar-summary-dialog.xul).

Initially I used the tabmail interface’s “shared tab” option — where a single XUL file is loaded and then its appearance and content is modified to create the appearance of completely different tabs. (This is how Thunderbird’s “3-pane” and “single message” tabs work, and also Lightning’s “Calendar” and “Tasks” tab.) However, this did not work when you opened multiple events/tasks in separate tabs. So I figured out the tabmail interface’s other option which loads each tab separately as you would expect and everything is now working fine.

The next step was to figure out how to access the data for an event (or task) from the tab. I actually figured out two ways to do this. The first was via the tabmail interface in the way that it is set up to work (i.e. “tabmail.currentTabInfo”). That meant that the current event dialog code (that referenced the data as a property of the “window” object) had to be changed to access it from this new location.  But that is not so good since we will be supporting both window and tab options and it would be nice if the same code could “just work” for both cases as much as possible.

So I figured out a second way to provide access to the data by just putting it in the right place relative to the iframe, so that the current code could reach it without having to be modified (i.e. still as a property of the “window” object, but with the “window” being relative to the iframe). This is a better approach since the same code will work for both cases (events/tasks in a dialog window or in a tab).

One small thing I implemented via the tabmail interface is that the title of the tab indicates whether you are creating a new item or modifying an existing one and whether the item is an event or a task. However, I will probably end up re-working this because the current dialog window code updates the title of the window as you change the title of the event/task, and that code can probably also be used to generate the initial title of the tab. This is something I will be looking into as I start to really work with the event dialog code.

On the UI design side of things, I created three new mockups based on some more feedback from Richard Marti and MakeMyDay. Part of the challenge is that there are a number of elements that vary in size depending on how many items they contain (e.g. reminders, categories, attachments, attendees). Mockups K and L were my attempt at a slightly different approach for handling this, although we will be following the design of mockup J going forward. You can take a look at these mockups and read notes about them on the wiki page.

The next steps will be to push toward a more finalized design and seek broader feedback on it.  On the coding side I will be identifying where things are not working yet and getting them to work. For example, the code for closing a window does not work from a tab and the status bar items are appearing just above the status bar (at the bottom of the window) because of the iframe.

So far I think things are going well. It is really encouraging that I am already able to create and modify events and tasks from a tab and that most of the basic functionality appears to be working fine.

— Paul Morris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Calendar: GSoC 2016: Getting Oriented

mo, 23/05/2016 - 22:07

Today is the first day of the “coding period” for Google Summer of Code 2016 and I’m excited to be working on the “Event in a Tab” project for Mozilla Calendar. The past month of the “community bonding period” has flown by as I made various preparations for the summer ahead. This post covers what I’ve been up to and my experience so far.

After the exciting news of my acceptance for GSoC I knew it was time to retire my venerable 2008 Apple laptop which had gotten somewhat slow and “long in the tooth.” Soon, with a newly refurbished 2014 laptop via Ebay in hand, I made the switch to GNU/Linux, dual-booting the latest Ubuntu 16.04. Having contributed to LilyPond before it felt familiar to fire up a terminal, follow the instructions for setting up my development environment, and build Thunderbird/Lightning. (I was even able to make a few improvements to the documentation – removed some obsolete info, fixed a typo, etc.) One difference from what I’m used to is using mercurial instead of git, although the two seem fairly similar. When I was preparing my application for GSoC my build succeeded but I only got a blank white window when opening Thunderbird. This time, thanks to some guidance from my mentor Philipp about selecting the revision to build, everything worked without any problems.

One of the highlights of the bonding period was meeting my mentors Philipp Kewisch (primary mentor) and MakeMyDay (secondary mentor). We had a video chat meeting to discuss the project and get me up to speed. They have been really supportive and helpful and I feel confident about the months ahead knowing that they “have my back.” That same day I also listened in on the Thunderbird meeting with Simon Phipps answering questions about his report on potential future legal homes for Thunderbird, which was an interesting discussion.

At this point I am feeling pretty well integrated into the Mozilla infrastructure after setting up a number of accounts – for Bugzilla, MDN, the Mozilla wiki, an LDAP account for making blog posts and later for commit access, etc. I got my feet wet with IRC (nick: pmorris), introduced myself on the Calendar dev team’s mailing list, and created a tracker bug and a wiki page for the project.

Following the Mozilla way of working in the open, the wiki page provides a public place to document the high-level details related to design, implementation, and the overall project plan. If you want to learn more about this “Event in a Tab” project, check out the wiki page.  It contains the mockup design that I made when applying for GSoC and my notes on the thinking behind it. I shared these with Richard Marti who is the resident expert on UI/UX for Thunderbird/Calendar and he gave me some good feedback and suggestions. I made a number of additional mockups for another round of feedback as we iterate towards the final design. One thing I have learned is that this kind of UI/UX design work is harder than it looks!

Additionally, I have been getting oriented with the code base and figuring out the first steps for the coding period, reading through XUL documentation and learning about Web Components and React, which are two options for an HTML implementation. It turns out there is a student team working on a new version of Thunderbird’s address book and they are also interested in using React, so there will be a larger conversation with the Thunderbird and Calendar dev teams about this. (Apparently React is already being used by the Developer Tools team and the Firefox Hello team.)

I think that about covers it for now. I’m excited for the coding period to get underway and grateful for the opportunity to work on this project. I’ll be posting updates to this blog under the “gsoc” tag, so you can follow my progress here.

— Paul Morris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Calendar: Google Summer of Code 2016

ti, 17/05/2016 - 23:58

It is about time for a new blog post. I know it has been a while and there are certainly some notable events I could have blogged about, but in today’s fast paced world I have preferred quick twitter messages.

The exciting news I would like to spread today is that we have a new Google Summer of Code student for this summer! May I introduce to you Paul Morris, who I believe is an awesome candidate. Here is a little information about Paul:

I am currently finishing my graduate degree and in my spare time I like to play music and work on alternative music notation systems (see Clairnote). I have written a few Firefox add-ons and I was interested in the “Event in a Tab” project because I wanted to contribute to Mozilla and to Thunderbird/Calendar which is used by millions of people and fills an important niche. It was also a good fit for my skills and an opportunity to learn more about using html/css/javascript for user interfaces.

Paul will be working on the Event in a Tab project, which aims to allow opening a calendar event or task in a tab, instead of in the current event dialog. Just imagine the endless possibilities we’d have with so much space! In the end you will be able to view events and tasks both in the traditional dialog and in a tab, depending on your preference and the situation you are in.

The project will have two phases, the first taking the current event dialog code and UI as is and making it possible to open it in a tab. The textboxes will inevitably be fairly wide, but I believe this is an important first step and gives users a workable result early on.

Once this is done, the second step is to re-implement the dialog using HTML instead of XUL, with a new layout that is made for the extra space we have in a tab. The layout should be adaptable, so that when the window is resized or the event is opened in a narrow dialog, the elements fall in to place, just like you’d experience in a reactive designed website. You can read more about the project on the wiki.

Paul has already made some great UI mock-ups in his proposal, we will be going through these with the Thunderbird UI experts to make sure we can provide you with the best experience possible. I am sure we will share some screenshots on the blog once the re-implementation phase comes closer.

Paul will be using this blog to give updates about his progress. The coding phase is about to start on May 22nd after which posts will become more frequent. Please join me in welcoming Paul and wishing him all the best for the summer!

 

 

 

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Andrew Sutherland: Web Worker-assisted Email Visualizations using Vega

mo, 21/03/2016 - 10:28

Faceted and overview visualizations

tl;dr: glodastrophe, the experimental entirely-client-side JS desktop-ish email app now supports Vega-based visualizations in addition to new support infrastructure for extension-y things and creating derived views based on the search/filter infrastructure.

Two of the dreams of Mozilla Messaging were:

  1. Shareable email workflows (credit to :davida).  If you could figure out how to set up your email client in a way that worked for you, you should be able to share that with others in a way that doesn’t require them to manually duplicate your efforts and ideally without you having to write code.  (And ideally without anyone having to review code/anything in order to ensure there are no privacy or security problems in the workflow.)
  2. Useful email visualizations.  While in the end, the only visualization ever shipped with Thunderbird was the simple timeline view of the faceted global search, various experiments happened along the way, some abandoned.  For example, the following screenshot shows one of the earlier stages of faceted search development where each facet attempted to visualize the relative proportion of messages sharing that facet.

faceted search UI prototype

At the time, the protovis JS visualization library was the state of the art.  Its successor the amazing, continually evolving d3 has eclipsed it.  d3, being a JS library, requires someone to write JS code.  A visualization written directly in JS runs into the whole code review issue.  What would be ideal is a means of specifying visualizations that is substantially more inert and easy to sandbox.

Enter, Vega, a visualization grammar that can be expressed in JSON that can not only define “simple” static visualizations, but also mind-blowing gapminder-style interactive visualizations.  Also, it has some very clever dataflow stuff under the hood and builds on d3 and its well-proven magic.  I performed a fairly extensive survey of the current visualization, faceting, and data processing options to help bring visualizations and faceted filtered search to glodastrophe and other potential gaia mail consumers like the Firefox OS Gaia Mail App.

Digression: Two relevant significant changes in how the gaia mail backend was designed compared to its predecessor Thunderbird (and its global database) are:

  1. As much as can possibly be done in a DOM/Web Worker(s) is done so.  This greatly assists in UI responsiveness.  Thunderbird has to do most things on the main thread because of hard-to-unwind implementation choices that permeate the codebase.
  2. It’s assumed that the local mail client may only have a subset of the messages known to the server, that the server may be smart, and that it’s possible to convince servers to support new functionality.  In many ways, this is still aspirational (the backend has not yet implemented search on server), but the architecture has always kept this in mind.

In terms of visualizations, what this means is that we pre-chew as much of the data in the worker as we can, drastically reducing both the amount of computation that needs to happen on the main (page) thread and the amount of data we have to send to it.  It also means that we could potentially farm all of this out to the server if its search capabilities are sufficiently advanced.  And/or the backend could cache previous results.

For example, in the faceted visualizations on the sidebar (placed side-by-side here):

faceted-histograms

In the “Prolific Authors” visualization definition, the backend in the worker constructs a Vega dataflow (only!).  The search/filter mechanism is spun up and the visualization’s data gathering needs specify that we will load the messages that belong to each conversation in consideration.  Then for each message we extract the author and age of the message and feed that to the dataflow graph.  The data transforms bin the messages by date, facet the messages by author, and aggregate the message bins within each author.  We then sort the authors by the number of messages they authored, and limit it to the top 5 authors which we then alphabetically sort.  If we were doing this on the front-end, we’d have to send all N messages from the back-end.  Instead, we send over just 5 histograms with a maximum of 60 data-points in each histogram, one per bin.

Same deal with “Prolific domains”, but we extract the author’s mail domain and aggregate based on that.

Authored content size overview heatmap

Similarly, the overview Authored content size over time heatmap visualization sends only the aggregated heatmap bins over the wire, not all the messages.  Elaborating, for each message body part, we (now) compute an estimate of the number of actual “fresh” content bytes in the message.  Anything we can detect as a quote or a mailing list footer or multiple paragraphs of legal disclaimers doesn’t count.  The x-axis bins by time; now is on the right, the oldest considered message is on the left.  The y-axis bins by the log of the authored content size.  Messages with zero new bytes are at the bottom, massive essays are at the top.  The current visualization is useless, but I think the ingredients can and will be used to create something more informative.

Other notable glodastrophe changes since the last blog post:

  • Front-end state management is now done using redux
  • The Material UI React library has been adopted for UI widget purposes, though the conversation and message summaries still need to be overhauled.
  • React was upgraded
  • A war was fought with flexbox and flexbox won.  Hard-coding and calc() are the only reason the visualizations look reasonably sized.
  • Webpack is now used for bundling in order to facilitate all of these upgrades and reduce potential contributor friction.

More to come!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Andrew Sutherland: An email conversation summary visualization

mo, 01/02/2016 - 12:29

We’ve been overhauling the Firefox OS Gaia Email app and its back-end to understand email conversations.  I also created a react.js-based desktop-ish development UI, glodastrophe, that consumes the same back-end.

My first attempt at summaries for glodastrophe was the following:

old summaries; 3 message tidbits

The back-end derives a conversation summary object from all of the messages that make up the conversation whenever any message in the conversation changes.  While there are some things that are always computed (the number of messages in the conversation, whether there are any unread messages, any starred/flagged messages, etc.), the back-end also provides hooks for the front-end to provide application logic to do its own processing to meet its UI needs.

In the case of this conversation summary, the application logic finds the first 3 unread messages in the conversation and stashes their date, author, and extracted snippet (if any) in a list of “tidbits”.  This also is used to determine the height of the conversation summary in the conversation list.  (The virtual list is aware of a quantized coordinate space where each conversation summary object is between 1 and 4 units high in this case.)

While this is interesting because it’s something Thunderbird’s thread pane could not do, it’s not clear that the tidbits are an efficient use of screen real-estate.  At least not when the number of unread messages in the conversation exceeds the 3 we cap the tidbits at.

time-based thread summary visualization

But our app logic can actually do anything it wants.  It could, say, establish the threading relationship of the messages in the conversation to enable us to make a highly dubious visualization of the thread structure in the conversation as well as show the activity in the conversation over time.  Much like the visualization you already saw before you read this sentence.  We can see the rhythm of the conversation.  We can know whether this is a highly active conversation that’s still ongoing, or just that someone has brought back to life.

Here’s the same visualization where we still use the d3 cluster layout but don’t clobber the x-position with our manual-quasi-logarithmic time-based scale:

the visualization without time-based x-positioning

Disclaimer: This visualization is ridiculously impractical in cases where a conversation has only a small number of messages.  But a neat thing is that the application logic could decide to use textual tidbits for small numbers of unread and a cool graph for larger numbers.  The graph’s vertical height could even vary based on the number of messages in the conversation.  Or the visualization could use thread-arcs if you like visualizations but want them based on actual research.

If you’re interested in the moving pieces in the implementation, they’re here:

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Matt Harris: Outlook.com / Office365 Imap subscribed folders disappear, difficulty in subscribing

sn, 23/01/2016 - 05:48
Over the past couple of days it has become apparent that there has been an issue with IMAP accounts hosted on office365 and outlook.com.  Support has received a number of complains of subscribed folders disappearing from Thunderbird and attempts to re-subscribe failing.

A workaround has been identified by turning off the Thunderbird option "Show only subscribed folders".

To turn off this option;
  1. Right click the account in the folder pane.
  2. Select the menu entry Settings
  3. In the server settings for the account,select the advanced button.
  4. In the advanced account settings dialog, un-check the option "Show only subscribed folders"


----o0O0o----

Microsoft have now acknowledged the issue as EX41924 and are posting updates here. At the time of writing this post the latest update (update 4) is suggesting a code solution has been developed and is currently being deployed across the office365 and outlook.com web sites to remediate the failure their previous patch caused.Affected users that wish to follow the Microsoft support thread on community.office365.com can find it here.

While it is unfortunate,  there is nothing the Thunderbird community can do in this other than offer the workaround until such time as Microsoft resume normal services.




Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Calendar: There is no Lightning 4.0

sn, 13/06/2015 - 02:10

…but of course there is is a release for Thunderbird 38! Since the release date for Thunderbird has been postponed and in the meanwhile Firefox has released 38.0.1, Thunderbird will also be released as Thunderbird 38.0.1. Since the Lightning version is automatically generated at build time, we have just released Lightning 4.0.0.1. If you are still using Thunderbird 31 and Lightning 3.3.3, you will be getting an update in the next days.

The exciting thing about this release is that Lightning has been integrated into Thunderbird. I expect there will be next to no issues during upgrade this time, because Thunderbird includes the Lightning addon already.

If you can’t wait, you can get Thunderbird in your language directly from mozilla.org. If you do happen to have issues with upgrading, you can also get Lightning from addons.mozilla.org. The latest Seamonkey version is 2.33.1 at the time of writing, you need to use Lightning 3.8b2 in this case. For more information on compatibility, check out the calendar versions page.

As mentioned in a previous blog post, most fixed issues are backend fixes that won’t be very visible. We do however have a great new feature to save copies of invitations to your calendar. This helps in case you don’t care about replying to the invitation but would still like to see it in your calendar. We also have more general improvements in invitation compatibility, performance and stability and some slight visual enhancements. The full list of changes can be found on bugzilla.

If you are upgrading manually, you might want to make a backup. Although I don’t anticipate any major issues, you never know.

If you have questions, would like support, or have found a bug, feel free to leave a comment here and I’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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